Forskning
Udskriv Udskriv
Switch language
Region Hovedstaden - en del af Københavns Universitetshospital
Udgivet

Personal electronic UVR dosimeter measurements: specific and general uncertainties

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

DOI

  1. Adult UVR exposure changes with life stage - a 14-year follow-up study using personal electronic UVR dosimeters

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  2. Pigment genes not skin pigmentation affect UVB-induced vitamin D

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  3. The half-life of 25(OH)D after UVB exposure depends on gender and vitamin D receptor polymorphism but mainly on the start level

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  4. UVR: sun, lamps, pigmentation and vitamin D

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  5. Major inter-personal variation in the increase and maximal level of 25-hydroxy vitamin D induced by UVB

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  1. Optimal sunscreen use, during a sun holiday with a very high ultraviolet index, allows vitamin D synthesis without sunburn

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  2. Daylight PDT acts by continuous activation of PpIX

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftLederForskningpeer review

  3. Serum 25(OH)D levels after oral vitamin D3 supplementation and UVB exposure correlate

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Vis graf over relationer

Personal ultraviolet radiation (UVR) dosimetry has been performed for decades to objectively measure human exposure to UVR. These measurements have been used to investigate solar behaviour and its negative effects on human health such as skin cancer and positive effects such as vitamin D formation. A specific electronic dosimeter is described with a spectral sensitivity as the erythema response for human skin and temperature measurements for compliance control. Technical, methodological and environmental causes of uncertainties regarding personal UV dosimetry are investigated using this dosimeter as an example, which enables us to show the dosimeter's limitations and enables readers to compare their dosimeters with that described and to increase awareness of imperfections of dosimeters. The dosimeter's spectral response, cosine response, linearity, temperature dependency and sensitivity are investigated. As opposed to biological and chemical dosimeters, electronic dosimeters do not measure UV radiation continuously but at time-intervals (sampling). The error introduced by sampling is investigated for sampling intervals from 1 second up to 60 seconds for 3 groups of people (n = 18, 1.1-4.6 hours of positive UV measurements) on sunny (n = 12) and cloudy (n = 6) days. Increasing the sample time by 1 second added on average an uncertainty of maximum +0.29% to -0.27% per added second compared to the 1-second sample time. The importance of dirt on the sensor was investigated in 24 dosimeters after 6 months use by farmers. The reduction in the registered dose due to the dirty sensor was 2.3% (median = 2.0%, inter-quartile range = 2.0%, max = 5%) suggesting that dirt on the sensor generally does not play a significant role.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftPhotochemical & photobiological sciences : Official journal of the European Photochemistry Association and the European Society for Photobiology
Vol/bind18
Udgave nummer6
Sider (fra-til)1461-1470
Antal sider10
ISSN1474-905X
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 12 jun. 2019

ID: 59054911