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Perceptions of safety culture and recording in the operating room: understanding barriers to video data capture

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OBJECTIVE: Recording in the operating room is an important tool to help surgical teams improve their performance. This is becoming more feasible using the Operating Room Black Box, a comprehensive data capture platform. Operating room (OR) staff, however, may voice reasonable concerns as recording initiatives are implemented. The objective of this study was to assess pre-implementation attitudes of OR staff toward operative recording and explore the relationship of these attitudes to the themes of (1) safety culture, (2) impostor syndrome, and (3) privacy concerns.

METHODS: This cross-sectional survey study measured staff members' beliefs and opinions of operative recording and used three previously validated tools (safety attitudes questionnaire, clance impostor phenomenon scale, and dispositional privacy concern) to assess personal and professional factors. Concepts were correlated using Pearson's correlation coefficient.

RESULTS: Forty-three staff members participated in this study, with a response rate of 45% (n = 43/96, 20/22 nurses, 9/11 gynecologists, 14/63 anesthesiologists). Opinions of operative data capture were generally positive (5-point Likert scale, mean = 3.81, SD = 0.91). Nurses tended to have more favorable opinions of the OR Black Box as compared to gynecologists and anesthesiologists, though this did not reach statistical significance (4.15 vs. 3.67 vs 3.43, p = 0.06). Impostor syndrome characteristics correlated with concerns about litigation related to recording (r =  - 0.32, p = 0.04).

CONCLUSION: There are personal and professional attributes of the OR team that impact perceptions of the OR Black Box and implications around privacy and litigation. Addressing these concerns may facilitate successful implementation of the OR Black Box and improve team communication and patient safety in the OR.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftSurgical Endoscopy
Vol/bind36
Udgave nummer6
Sider (fra-til)3789-3797
Antal sider9
ISSN0930-2794
DOI
StatusUdgivet - jun. 2022

Bibliografisk note

© 2021. The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature.

ID: 79442505