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PD-L1-specific T cells

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftReviewForskningpeer review

DOI

  1. Evidence of immune elimination, immuno-editing and immune escape in patients with hematological cancer

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftReviewForskningpeer review

  2. Arginase-1-based vaccination against the tumor microenvironment: the identification of an optimal T-cell epitope

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftReviewForskningpeer review

  3. TAM-ing T cells in the tumor microenvironment: implications for TAM receptor targeting

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftReviewForskningpeer review

  4. Tumor-induced escape mechanisms and their association with resistance to checkpoint inhibitor therapy

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftReviewForskningpeer review

  5. Cancer immunotherapy in patients with brain metastases

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftReviewForskningpeer review

  1. CTLA-4 blockade boosts the expansion of tumor-reactive CD8+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes in ovarian cancer

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  2. Evidence of immune elimination, immuno-editing and immune escape in patients with hematological cancer

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftReviewForskningpeer review

  3. Long-Term Exposure to Inflammation Induces Differential Cytokine Patterns and Apoptosis in Dendritic Cells

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  4. Arginase-1-based vaccination against the tumor microenvironment: the identification of an optimal T-cell epitope

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftReviewForskningpeer review

Vis graf over relationer

Recently, there has been an increased focus on the immune checkpoint protein PD-1 and its ligand PD-L1 due to the discovery that blocking the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway with monoclonal antibodies elicits striking clinical results in many different malignancies. We have described naturally occurring PD-L1-specific T cells that recognize both PD-L1-expressing immune cells and malignant cells. Thus, PD-L1-specific T cells have the ability to modulate adaptive immune reactions by reacting to regulatory cells. Thus, utilization of PD-L1-derived T cell epitopes may represent an attractive vaccination strategy for targeting the tumor microenvironment and for boosting the clinical effects of additional anticancer immunotherapy. This review summarizes present information about PD-L1 as a T cell antigen, depicts the initial findings about the function of PD-L1-specific T cells in the adjustment of immune responses, and discusses future opportunities.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftCancer immunology, immunotherapy : CII
Vol/bind65
Udgave nummer7
Sider (fra-til)797-804
ISSN0340-7004
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2 jan. 2016

ID: 45949544