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Region Hovedstaden - en del af Københavns Universitetshospital
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Patient-reported outcomes are independent predictors of one-year mortality and cardiac events across cardiac diagnoses: Findings from the national DenHeart survey

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AIMS: Patient-reported quality of life and anxiety/depression scores provide important prognostic information independently of traditional clinical data. The aims of this study were to describe: (a) mortality and cardiac events one year after hospital discharge across cardiac diagnoses; (b) patient-reported outcomes at hospital discharge as a predictor of mortality and cardiac events.

DESIGN: A cross-sectional survey with register follow-up.

METHODS: Participants: All patients discharged from April 2013 to April 2014 from five national heart centres in Denmark.

MAIN OUTCOMES: Patient-reported outcomes: anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale); perceived health (Short Form-12); quality of life (HeartQoL and EQ-5D); symptom burden (Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale). Register data: mortality and cardiac events within one year following discharge.

RESULTS: There were 471 deaths among the 16,689 respondents in the first year after discharge. Across diagnostic groups, patients reporting symptoms of anxiety had a two-fold greater mortality risk when adjusted for age, sex, marital status, educational level, comorbidity, smoking, body mass index and alcohol intake (hazard ratio (HR) 1.92, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.52-2.42). Similar increased mortality risks were found for patients reporting symptoms of depression (HR 2.29, 95% CI 1.81-2.90), poor quality of life (HR 0.46, 95% CI 0.39-0.54) and severe symptom distress (HR 2.47, 95% CI 1.92-3.19). Cardiac events were predicted by poor quality of life (HR 0.71, 95% CI 0.65-0.77) and severe symptom distress (HR 1.58, 95% CI 1.35-1.85).

CONCLUSIONS: Patient-reported mental and physical health outcomes are independent predictors of one-year mortality and cardiac events across cardiac diagnoses.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftEuropean journal of preventive cardiology
Vol/bind26
Udgave nummer6
Sider (fra-til)624-637
Antal sider14
ISSN2047-4873
DOI
StatusUdgivet - apr. 2019

ID: 56977439