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Region Hovedstaden - en del af Københavns Universitetshospital
Udgivet

Pain and knee function in relation to degree of bone bruise after acute anterior cruciate ligament rupture

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Vis graf over relationer
It is unknown whether the bone bruise that occurs in connection with acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture is causing pain and dysfunction. We followed prospectively 17 patients [10 men, seven women, mean age 28 years (range 23-34)] with acute ACL rupture for 2 months. A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan was performed shortly after the injury, and at 2 weeks, 1 month and 2 months. The patients reported the level of pain every day and filled in a Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score sheet in connection with MRI. For every MRI of the knee, volume of bone bruise was calculated, and intensity was visually graded. Our study showed a reduction of the pain to 50% approximately 2 weeks after the injury, at which time the bone bruise was at maximum. There was a significant relationship between pain and the volume and intensity of the bone bruise in the medial tibia condyle, as well as pain and the bone bruise volume of the lateral femoral condyle. Patients with bone bruise of the medial tibia and patients with meniscal lesions had more pain. It is suggested that pain and decreased function after acute ACL injury most likely is related to soft tissue and cartilage injury and not to bone bruise.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftScandinavian journal of medicine & science in sports
Vol/bind22
Udgave nummer5
Sider (fra-til)635-642
ISSN0905-7188
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2012

ID: 34790325