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Region Hovedstaden - en del af Københavns Universitetshospital
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Occurrence of shockable rhythm in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest over time: a report from the COSTA group

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  • Iris Oving
  • Corina de Graaf
  • Lena Karlsson
  • Martin Jonsson
  • Jo Kramer-Johansen
  • Ellinor Berglund
  • Michiel Hulleman
  • Stefanie G Beesems
  • Rudolph W Koster
  • Theresa M Olasveengen
  • Mattias Ringh
  • Andreas Claessen
  • Freddy Lippert
  • Jacob Hollenberg
  • Fredrik Folke
  • Hanno L Tan
  • Marieke T Blom
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BACKGROUND: Prior research suggests that the proportion of a shockable initial rhythm (SIR) in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) declined during the last decades. This study aims to investigate if this decline is still ongoing and explore the relationship between location of OHCA and proportion of a SIR as initial rhythm.

METHODS: We calculated the proportion of patients with a SIR between 2006-2015 using pooled data from the COSTA-group (Copenhagen, Oslo, Stockholm, Amsterdam). Analyses were stratified according to location of OHCA (residential vs. public).

RESULTS: A total of 19,054 OHCA cases were included. Overall, the total proportion of cases with a SIR decreased from 42% to 37% (P < 0.01) from 2006 to 2015. When stratified according to location, the proportion of cases with a SIR decreased for OHCAs at a residential location (34% to 27%; P = 0.03), while the proportion of a SIR was stable among OHCAs in public locations (59% to 57%; P = 0.2). During the last years of the study period (2011-2015), the overall proportion of a SIR remained stable (38% to 37%; P = 0.45); this was observed for both residential and public OHCA.

CONCLUSION: We found a decline in the proportion of patients with a SIR in OHCAs at a residential location; this decline levelled off during the second half of the study period (2011-2015). In public locations, we observed no decline in SIR over time.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftResuscitation
ISSN0300-9572
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 8 apr. 2020

ID: 59767970