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Novel Insights From Human Studies on the Role of High-Density Lipoprotein in Mortality and Noncardiovascular Disease

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftReviewForskningpeer review

DOI

  1. Apolipoprotein M and Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Receptor 1 promote the transendothelial transport of High-Density Lipoprotein

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  2. Low High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol and High White Blood Cell Counts: A Mendelian Randomization Study

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  3. Plasma Albumin and Incident Cardiovascular Disease: Results From the CGPS and an Updated Meta-Analysis

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  4. Smoking and Increased White and Red Blood Cells: A Mendelian Randomization Approach in the Copenhagen General Population Study

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  1. HIV infection is associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftLetterForskningpeer review

  2. Common variants in Alzheimer's disease and risk stratification by polygenic risk scores

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  3. Mendelian randomisation study of smoking exposure in relation to breast cancer risk

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Vis graf over relationer

The vast majority of research about HDL (high-density lipoprotein) has for decades revolved around the possible role of HDL in atherosclerosis and its therapeutic potential within cardiovascular disease prevention; however, failures with therapies aimed at increasing HDL cholesterol has left questions as to what the role and function of HDL in human health and disease is. Recent observational studies have further shown that extreme high HDL cholesterol is associated with high mortality leading to speculations that HDL could in some instances be harmful. In addition, evidence from observational, and to a lesser extent genetic studies has emerged indicating that HDL might be associated with the development of other major noncardiovascular diseases, such as infectious disease, autoimmune disease, cancer, type 2 diabetes, kidney disease, and lung disease. In this review, we discuss (1) the association between extreme high HDL cholesterol and mortality and (2) the emerging human evidence linking HDL to several major diseases outside the realm of cardiovascular disease.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftArteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology
Vol/bind41
Udgave nummer1
Sider (fra-til)128-140
Antal sider13
ISSN1079-5642
DOI
StatusUdgivet - jan. 2021

ID: 61929749