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Newborn body composition after maternal bariatric surgery

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@article{99eaa537187f4ef2a95d4c9f8c6bd29b,
title = "Newborn body composition after maternal bariatric surgery",
abstract = "INTRODUCTION: In pregnancy after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), there is increased risk of low birthweight in the offspring. The present study examined how offspring body composition was affected by RYGB.MATERIAL AND METHODS: Mother-newborn dyads, where the mothers had undergone RYGB were included. Main outcome measure was neonatal body composition. Neonatal body composition was assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scanning (DXA) within 48 hours after birth. In a statistical model offspring born after RYGB were compared with a reference material of offspring and analyses were made to estimate the effect of maternal pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI), gestational weight gain, parity, gestational age at birth and newborn sex on newborn body composition. Analyses were made to estimate the impact of maternal weight loss before pregnancy and of other effects of bariatric surgery respectively. The study was performed at a university hospital between October 2012 and December 2013.RESULTS: We included 25 mother-newborn dyads where the mothers had undergone RYGB and compared them to a reference material of 311 mother-newborn dyads with comparable pre-pregnancy BMI. Offspring born by mothers after RYGB had lower birthweight (335g, p<0.001), fat-free mass (268g, p<0.001) and fat{\%} (2.8{\%}, p<0.001) compared with reference material. Only 2{\%} of the average reduction in newborn fat free mass could be attributed to maternal pre-pregnancy weight loss whereas other effects of RYGB accounted for 98{\%}. Regarding reduction in fat mass 52{\%} was attributed to weight loss and 47{\%} to other effects of surgery.CONCLUSION: Offspring born after maternal bariatric surgery, had lower birthweight, fat-free mass and fat percentage when compared with a reference material. RYGB itself and not the pre-pregnancy weight loss seems to have had the greatest impact on fetal growth.",
author = "Carlsen, {Emma Malchau} and Renault, {Kristina Martha} and M{\o}ller, {Bertha Kanijo} and Kirsten N{\o}rgaard and {Beck Jensen}, Jens-Erik and Jeannet Lauenborg and Dina Cortes and Ole Pryds",
year = "2020",
month = "5",
day = "13",
doi = "10.1371/journal.pone.0231579",
language = "English",
volume = "15",
journal = "P L o S One",
issn = "1932-6203",
publisher = "Public Library of Science",
number = "5",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Newborn body composition after maternal bariatric surgery

AU - Carlsen, Emma Malchau

AU - Renault, Kristina Martha

AU - Møller, Bertha Kanijo

AU - Nørgaard, Kirsten

AU - Beck Jensen, Jens-Erik

AU - Lauenborg, Jeannet

AU - Cortes, Dina

AU - Pryds, Ole

PY - 2020/5/13

Y1 - 2020/5/13

N2 - INTRODUCTION: In pregnancy after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), there is increased risk of low birthweight in the offspring. The present study examined how offspring body composition was affected by RYGB.MATERIAL AND METHODS: Mother-newborn dyads, where the mothers had undergone RYGB were included. Main outcome measure was neonatal body composition. Neonatal body composition was assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scanning (DXA) within 48 hours after birth. In a statistical model offspring born after RYGB were compared with a reference material of offspring and analyses were made to estimate the effect of maternal pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI), gestational weight gain, parity, gestational age at birth and newborn sex on newborn body composition. Analyses were made to estimate the impact of maternal weight loss before pregnancy and of other effects of bariatric surgery respectively. The study was performed at a university hospital between October 2012 and December 2013.RESULTS: We included 25 mother-newborn dyads where the mothers had undergone RYGB and compared them to a reference material of 311 mother-newborn dyads with comparable pre-pregnancy BMI. Offspring born by mothers after RYGB had lower birthweight (335g, p<0.001), fat-free mass (268g, p<0.001) and fat% (2.8%, p<0.001) compared with reference material. Only 2% of the average reduction in newborn fat free mass could be attributed to maternal pre-pregnancy weight loss whereas other effects of RYGB accounted for 98%. Regarding reduction in fat mass 52% was attributed to weight loss and 47% to other effects of surgery.CONCLUSION: Offspring born after maternal bariatric surgery, had lower birthweight, fat-free mass and fat percentage when compared with a reference material. RYGB itself and not the pre-pregnancy weight loss seems to have had the greatest impact on fetal growth.

AB - INTRODUCTION: In pregnancy after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), there is increased risk of low birthweight in the offspring. The present study examined how offspring body composition was affected by RYGB.MATERIAL AND METHODS: Mother-newborn dyads, where the mothers had undergone RYGB were included. Main outcome measure was neonatal body composition. Neonatal body composition was assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scanning (DXA) within 48 hours after birth. In a statistical model offspring born after RYGB were compared with a reference material of offspring and analyses were made to estimate the effect of maternal pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI), gestational weight gain, parity, gestational age at birth and newborn sex on newborn body composition. Analyses were made to estimate the impact of maternal weight loss before pregnancy and of other effects of bariatric surgery respectively. The study was performed at a university hospital between October 2012 and December 2013.RESULTS: We included 25 mother-newborn dyads where the mothers had undergone RYGB and compared them to a reference material of 311 mother-newborn dyads with comparable pre-pregnancy BMI. Offspring born by mothers after RYGB had lower birthweight (335g, p<0.001), fat-free mass (268g, p<0.001) and fat% (2.8%, p<0.001) compared with reference material. Only 2% of the average reduction in newborn fat free mass could be attributed to maternal pre-pregnancy weight loss whereas other effects of RYGB accounted for 98%. Regarding reduction in fat mass 52% was attributed to weight loss and 47% to other effects of surgery.CONCLUSION: Offspring born after maternal bariatric surgery, had lower birthweight, fat-free mass and fat percentage when compared with a reference material. RYGB itself and not the pre-pregnancy weight loss seems to have had the greatest impact on fetal growth.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85084592788&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1371/journal.pone.0231579

DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0231579

M3 - Journal article

VL - 15

JO - P L o S One

JF - P L o S One

SN - 1932-6203

IS - 5

M1 - e0231579

ER -

ID: 59838008