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New antidepressant utilization pre- and post-bereavement: a population-based study of partners and adult children

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Ornstein, Katherine A ; Aldridge, Melissa ; Gillezeau, Christina ; Kristensen, Marie S ; Gazibara, Tatjana ; Groenvold, Mogens ; Thygesen, Lau C. / New antidepressant utilization pre- and post-bereavement : a population-based study of partners and adult children. I: Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology. 2020 ; Bind 55, Nr. 10. s. 1261-1271.

Bibtex

@article{ce73dab08b3a42dab91f6053fe3f4159,
title = "New antidepressant utilization pre- and post-bereavement: a population-based study of partners and adult children",
abstract = "PURPOSE: Bereavement is associated with increased morbidity and mortality, but few studies have examined the specific timing of depression onset. This study examines the risk of developing new-onset depression in adult children and partners by month, 1 year before and after death.METHODS: Using population-based registers in Denmark, we assembled a cohort of 236,000 individuals who died a natural death (2010-2016). Partners and adult children of the deceased were identified and demographic and prescription data were collected. GEE logistic regression was used to model whether the bereaved received a new antidepressant prescription around the death of their loved one across 24 time intervals (12 months before and after death).RESULTS: Male and female partners had an increase in receipt of new antidepressant prescriptions in the 11 months after the death of their partner, with a peak increase 2 or 3 months after death. Partners also increased new antidepressant prescription use 2 months before death. Characteristics of the decedents including cause of death were not associated with new antidepressant prescription in the surviving partner. Adult children did not have increased odds of being prescribed new antidepressants at any time.CONCLUSION: Both male and female partners have increase in new antidepressant utilization before and after the death of their partner. Our work points to the importance of supporting partners not only after the death of their partner, but also in the period before death when families may be actively engaged in caregiving for the seriously ill.",
keywords = "Antidepressant, Bereavement, Depression, Family, Adult Children, Grief, Humans, Male, Adult, Antidepressive Agents/therapeutic use, Female, Child, Cohort Studies",
author = "Ornstein, {Katherine A} and Melissa Aldridge and Christina Gillezeau and Kristensen, {Marie S} and Tatjana Gazibara and Mogens Groenvold and Thygesen, {Lau C}",
year = "2020",
month = oct,
doi = "10.1007/s00127-020-01857-1",
language = "English",
volume = "55",
pages = "1261--1271",
journal = "Social Psychiatry",
issn = "0933-7954",
publisher = "Dr. Dietrich/Steinkopff Verlag",
number = "10",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - New antidepressant utilization pre- and post-bereavement

T2 - a population-based study of partners and adult children

AU - Ornstein, Katherine A

AU - Aldridge, Melissa

AU - Gillezeau, Christina

AU - Kristensen, Marie S

AU - Gazibara, Tatjana

AU - Groenvold, Mogens

AU - Thygesen, Lau C

PY - 2020/10

Y1 - 2020/10

N2 - PURPOSE: Bereavement is associated with increased morbidity and mortality, but few studies have examined the specific timing of depression onset. This study examines the risk of developing new-onset depression in adult children and partners by month, 1 year before and after death.METHODS: Using population-based registers in Denmark, we assembled a cohort of 236,000 individuals who died a natural death (2010-2016). Partners and adult children of the deceased were identified and demographic and prescription data were collected. GEE logistic regression was used to model whether the bereaved received a new antidepressant prescription around the death of their loved one across 24 time intervals (12 months before and after death).RESULTS: Male and female partners had an increase in receipt of new antidepressant prescriptions in the 11 months after the death of their partner, with a peak increase 2 or 3 months after death. Partners also increased new antidepressant prescription use 2 months before death. Characteristics of the decedents including cause of death were not associated with new antidepressant prescription in the surviving partner. Adult children did not have increased odds of being prescribed new antidepressants at any time.CONCLUSION: Both male and female partners have increase in new antidepressant utilization before and after the death of their partner. Our work points to the importance of supporting partners not only after the death of their partner, but also in the period before death when families may be actively engaged in caregiving for the seriously ill.

AB - PURPOSE: Bereavement is associated with increased morbidity and mortality, but few studies have examined the specific timing of depression onset. This study examines the risk of developing new-onset depression in adult children and partners by month, 1 year before and after death.METHODS: Using population-based registers in Denmark, we assembled a cohort of 236,000 individuals who died a natural death (2010-2016). Partners and adult children of the deceased were identified and demographic and prescription data were collected. GEE logistic regression was used to model whether the bereaved received a new antidepressant prescription around the death of their loved one across 24 time intervals (12 months before and after death).RESULTS: Male and female partners had an increase in receipt of new antidepressant prescriptions in the 11 months after the death of their partner, with a peak increase 2 or 3 months after death. Partners also increased new antidepressant prescription use 2 months before death. Characteristics of the decedents including cause of death were not associated with new antidepressant prescription in the surviving partner. Adult children did not have increased odds of being prescribed new antidepressants at any time.CONCLUSION: Both male and female partners have increase in new antidepressant utilization before and after the death of their partner. Our work points to the importance of supporting partners not only after the death of their partner, but also in the period before death when families may be actively engaged in caregiving for the seriously ill.

KW - Antidepressant

KW - Bereavement

KW - Depression

KW - Family

KW - Adult Children

KW - Grief

KW - Humans

KW - Male

KW - Adult

KW - Antidepressive Agents/therapeutic use

KW - Female

KW - Child

KW - Cohort Studies

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85082775143&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s00127-020-01857-1

DO - 10.1007/s00127-020-01857-1

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 32185418

VL - 55

SP - 1261

EP - 1271

JO - Social Psychiatry

JF - Social Psychiatry

SN - 0933-7954

IS - 10

ER -

ID: 59912686