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Myocardial injury and mortality in patients with excessive oxygen administration before cardiac arrest

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Introduction: Hyperoxia after cardiac arrest may be associated with higher mortality, and trials have found that excess oxygen administration in patients with myocardial infarction is associated with increased infarct size. The effect of hyperoxia before cardiac arrest is sparsely investigated. Our aim was to assess the association between excessive oxygen administration before cardiac arrest and the extent of subsequent myocardial injury. Methods: We performed a retrospective study including patients who had in-hospital cardiac arrest during 2014 in the Capital Region of Denmark. We excluded patients without peripheral oxygen saturation measurements within 48 hours before cardiac arrest. Patients were divided in three groups of pre-arrest oxygen exposure, based on average peripheral oxygen saturation and supplemental oxygen. Primary outcome was peak troponin concentration within 30 days. Secondary outcomes included 30-day mortality. Data were analyzed using multiple logistic regression and Wilcoxon rank sum test. Results: Of 163 patients with cardiac arrest, 28 had excessive oxygen administration (17%), 105 had normal oxygen administration (64%) and 30 had insufficient oxygen administration (18%) before cardiac arrest. Peak troponin was median 224 ng/L in the excessive oxygen administration group vs 365 ng/L in the normal oxygen administration group (P =.54); 20 of 28 (71%) in the excessive oxygen administration group died within 30 days compared to 54 of 105 (51%) in the normal oxygen administration group. (OR 1.87, 95% CI 0.56-6.19). Conclusions: Excessive oxygen administration within 48 hours before in-hospital cardiac arrest was not statistically associated with significantly higher peak troponin or mortality.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftActa Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica
Vol/bind63
Udgave nummer10
Sider (fra-til)1330-1336
Antal sider7
ISSN0001-5172
DOI
StatusUdgivet - nov. 2019

ID: 57633328