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Region Hovedstaden - en del af Københavns Universitetshospital
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Mycobacterium intracellulare Infection Mimicking Progression of Scleroderma

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DOI

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Vis graf over relationer

This case report describes a patient with scleroderma who developed Mycobacterium intracellulare infection, which for more than a year mimicked worsening of her connective tissue disorder. The patient was diagnosed with scleroderma based on puffy fingers that developed into sclerodactyly, abnormal nail fold capillaries, interstitial lung disease, Raynaud's phenomenon, esophageal dysmotility, and positivity for rheumatoid factor and anti-SSA antibodies. She developed massive inflammatory changes of the cutis, the subcutis, and the muscle fasciae of the right leg, that after several failed attempts of immunosuppressive treatments were found to be caused by Mycobacterium intracellulare. While she was receiving high-dose prednisolone, as worsening of her connective tissue disease was suspected to be the cause of the inflammatory changes, she had Listeria monocytogenes meningitis and was hospitalized for several weeks, but she recovered from this without sequelae. After Mycobacterium intracellulare infection was diagnosed, she was treated with clarithromycin and rifampicin. Her skin manifestations, arthralgias, and fatigue improved considerably, and the wounds of the right leg healed, unfortunately with significant scarring. Immunodeficiency testing was unremarkable. In summary, an infection with Mycobacterium intracellulare was mistaken for an unusually severe progression of scleroderma.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftCase Reports in Rheumatology
Vol/bind2017
Sider (fra-til)e4029271
ISSN2090-6889
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2017

ID: 52040829