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Region Hovedstaden - en del af Københavns Universitetshospital
E-pub ahead of print

Mortality and Urological Complications After Open Groin Hernia Repair in Local, General, and Regional Anesthesia: A Nationwide Linked Register Study

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

DOI

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BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The choice of anesthesia method may influence mortality and postoperative urological complications after open groin hernia repair. We aimed to investigate the association between type of anesthesia and incidence of urinary retention, urethral stricture, prostate surgery, and 1-year mortality after open groin hernia repair.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data were linked from the Danish Hernia Database, the national patient register, and the register of causes of death. We investigated data on male adult patients receiving open groin hernia repair from 1999 to 2013 with either local anesthesia, regional anesthesia, or general anesthesia. In relation to the type of anesthesia, we compared mortality and urological complications up to 1 year postoperatively. We adjusted for covariates in a logistic regression assessing urological complications and with the Cox regression assessing mortality.

RESULTS: We included 113,069 open groin hernia repairs in local anesthesia, regional anesthesia, or general anesthesia. The risk of urinary retention adjusted for covariates was higher after both general anesthesia (adjusted odds ratio = 1.64, 95% confidence interval = 1.05-2.57, p = 0.031) and regional anesthesia (odds ratio = 2.99, 95% confidence interval = 1.67-5.34, p < 0.0005) compared with local anesthesia. The adjusted risk of prostate surgery was also higher for both general anesthesia (odds ratio = 1.58, 95% confidence interval = 1.23-2.03, p < 0.0005) and regional anesthesia (odds ratio = 1.90, 95% confidence interval = 1.40-2.58, p < 0.0005) compared with local anesthesia. Type of anesthesia did not influence 1-year mortality or the risk for urethral stricture.

CONCLUSION: Patients undergoing open groin hernia repair in local anesthesia experience the lowest rate of urological complications and have equally low mortality compared with patients undergoing repair in general anesthesia or regional anesthesia.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
Artikelnummer1457496919877580
TidsskriftScandinavian journal of surgery : SJS : official organ for the Finnish Surgical Society and the Scandinavian Surgical Society
ISSN1457-4969
DOI
StatusE-pub ahead of print - 2 okt. 2019

ID: 59052659