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Mood instability in patients with newly diagnosed bipolar disorder, unaffected relatives, and healthy control individuals measured daily using smartphones

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@article{33fd377287b2466aa00b76aa4b52083e,
title = "Mood instability in patients with newly diagnosed bipolar disorder, unaffected relatives, and healthy control individuals measured daily using smartphones",
abstract = "Objectives: To investigate whether mood instability (MI) qualify as a trait marker for bipolar disorder (BD) we investigated: 1) differences in smartphone-based self-reported MI between three groups: patients with newly diagnosed BD, unaffected first-degree relatives (UR), and healthy control individuals (HC); 2) the correlation between MI and functioning, stress, and duration of illness, respectively; and 3) the validity of smartphone-based self-evaluated mood ratings as compared to observer-based ratings of depressed and manic mood. Methods: 203 patients with newly diagnosed BD, 54 UR and 109 HC were included as part of the longitudinal Bipolar Illness Onset study. Participants completed daily smartphone-based mood ratings for a period of up to two years and were clinically assessed with ratings of depression, mania and functioning. Results: Mood instability scores were statistically significantly higher in patients with BD compared with HC (mean=1.18, 95{\%}CI: 1.12;1.24 vs 1.05, 95{\%}CI: 0.98;1.13, p = 0.007) and did not differ between patients with BD and UR (mean=1.17, 95{\%}CI: 1.07;1.28, p = 0.91). For patients, increased MI scores correlated positively with impaired functioning (p<0.001), increased stress level (p<0.001) and increasing number of prior mood episodes (p<0.001). Smartphone-based mood ratings correlated with ratings of mood according to sub-item 1 on the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale 17-items and the Young Mania Rating Scale, respectively (p´s<0.001). Limitation: The study had a smaller number of UR than planned. Conclusion: Mood instability is increased in patients with newly diagnosed BD and unaffected relatives and associated with decreased functioning. The findings highlight MI as a potential trait marker for BD.",
keywords = "Bipolar disorder, Electronic monitoring, Mood instability, Self-reports, Smartphone",
author = "Sharleny Stanislaus and Maria Faurholt-Jepsen and Maj Vinberg and Klara Coello and Kj{\ae}rstad, {Hanne Lie} and Sigurd Melbye and Sletved, {Kimie Stefanie Ormstrup} and Christensen, {Ellen Margrethe} and Mads Frost and Bardram, {Jakob E} and Kessing, {Lars Vedel}",
note = "Copyright {\circledC} 2020 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.",
year = "2020",
month = "6",
day = "15",
doi = "10.1016/j.jad.2020.03.049",
language = "English",
volume = "271",
pages = "336--344",
journal = "Journal of Affective Disorders",
issn = "0165-0327",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Mood instability in patients with newly diagnosed bipolar disorder, unaffected relatives, and healthy control individuals measured daily using smartphones

AU - Stanislaus, Sharleny

AU - Faurholt-Jepsen, Maria

AU - Vinberg, Maj

AU - Coello, Klara

AU - Kjærstad, Hanne Lie

AU - Melbye, Sigurd

AU - Sletved, Kimie Stefanie Ormstrup

AU - Christensen, Ellen Margrethe

AU - Frost, Mads

AU - Bardram, Jakob E

AU - Kessing, Lars Vedel

N1 - Copyright © 2020 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

PY - 2020/6/15

Y1 - 2020/6/15

N2 - Objectives: To investigate whether mood instability (MI) qualify as a trait marker for bipolar disorder (BD) we investigated: 1) differences in smartphone-based self-reported MI between three groups: patients with newly diagnosed BD, unaffected first-degree relatives (UR), and healthy control individuals (HC); 2) the correlation between MI and functioning, stress, and duration of illness, respectively; and 3) the validity of smartphone-based self-evaluated mood ratings as compared to observer-based ratings of depressed and manic mood. Methods: 203 patients with newly diagnosed BD, 54 UR and 109 HC were included as part of the longitudinal Bipolar Illness Onset study. Participants completed daily smartphone-based mood ratings for a period of up to two years and were clinically assessed with ratings of depression, mania and functioning. Results: Mood instability scores were statistically significantly higher in patients with BD compared with HC (mean=1.18, 95%CI: 1.12;1.24 vs 1.05, 95%CI: 0.98;1.13, p = 0.007) and did not differ between patients with BD and UR (mean=1.17, 95%CI: 1.07;1.28, p = 0.91). For patients, increased MI scores correlated positively with impaired functioning (p<0.001), increased stress level (p<0.001) and increasing number of prior mood episodes (p<0.001). Smartphone-based mood ratings correlated with ratings of mood according to sub-item 1 on the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale 17-items and the Young Mania Rating Scale, respectively (p´s<0.001). Limitation: The study had a smaller number of UR than planned. Conclusion: Mood instability is increased in patients with newly diagnosed BD and unaffected relatives and associated with decreased functioning. The findings highlight MI as a potential trait marker for BD.

AB - Objectives: To investigate whether mood instability (MI) qualify as a trait marker for bipolar disorder (BD) we investigated: 1) differences in smartphone-based self-reported MI between three groups: patients with newly diagnosed BD, unaffected first-degree relatives (UR), and healthy control individuals (HC); 2) the correlation between MI and functioning, stress, and duration of illness, respectively; and 3) the validity of smartphone-based self-evaluated mood ratings as compared to observer-based ratings of depressed and manic mood. Methods: 203 patients with newly diagnosed BD, 54 UR and 109 HC were included as part of the longitudinal Bipolar Illness Onset study. Participants completed daily smartphone-based mood ratings for a period of up to two years and were clinically assessed with ratings of depression, mania and functioning. Results: Mood instability scores were statistically significantly higher in patients with BD compared with HC (mean=1.18, 95%CI: 1.12;1.24 vs 1.05, 95%CI: 0.98;1.13, p = 0.007) and did not differ between patients with BD and UR (mean=1.17, 95%CI: 1.07;1.28, p = 0.91). For patients, increased MI scores correlated positively with impaired functioning (p<0.001), increased stress level (p<0.001) and increasing number of prior mood episodes (p<0.001). Smartphone-based mood ratings correlated with ratings of mood according to sub-item 1 on the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale 17-items and the Young Mania Rating Scale, respectively (p´s<0.001). Limitation: The study had a smaller number of UR than planned. Conclusion: Mood instability is increased in patients with newly diagnosed BD and unaffected relatives and associated with decreased functioning. The findings highlight MI as a potential trait marker for BD.

KW - Bipolar disorder

KW - Electronic monitoring

KW - Mood instability

KW - Self-reports

KW - Smartphone

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85084517356&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jad.2020.03.049

DO - 10.1016/j.jad.2020.03.049

M3 - Journal article

VL - 271

SP - 336

EP - 344

JO - Journal of Affective Disorders

JF - Journal of Affective Disorders

SN - 0165-0327

ER -

ID: 60949569