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Mode of delivery shapes gut colonization pattern and modulates regulatory immunity in mice

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Hansen, CH, Andersen, LSF, Krych, L, Metzdorff, SB, Hasselby, JP, Skov, S, Nielsen, DS, Buschard, K, Hansen, LH & Hansen, AK 2014, 'Mode of delivery shapes gut colonization pattern and modulates regulatory immunity in mice' Journal of immunology (Baltimore, Md. : 1950), bind 193, nr. 3, s. 1213-22. https://doi.org/10.4049/jimmunol.1400085

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Author

Hansen, Camilla Højgaard ; Andersen, Line S F ; Krych, Lukasz ; Metzdorff, Stine Broeng ; Hasselby, Jane P ; Skov, Søren ; Nielsen, Dennis S ; Buschard, Karsten ; Hansen, Lars H ; Hansen, Axel K. / Mode of delivery shapes gut colonization pattern and modulates regulatory immunity in mice. I: Journal of immunology (Baltimore, Md. : 1950). 2014 ; Bind 193, Nr. 3. s. 1213-22.

Bibtex

@article{780757363d34407a9d3227c27e0a7dac,
title = "Mode of delivery shapes gut colonization pattern and modulates regulatory immunity in mice",
abstract = "Delivery mode has been associated with long-term changes in gut microbiota composition and more recently also with changes in the immune system. This has further been suggested to link Cesarean section (C-section) with an increased risk for development of immune-mediated diseases such as type 1 diabetes. In this study, we demonstrate that both C-section and cross-fostering with a genetically distinct strain influence the gut microbiota composition and immune key markers in mice. Gut microbiota profiling by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and 454/FLX-based 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing revealed that mice born by C-section had a distinct bacterial profile at weaning characterized by higher abundance of Bacteroides and Lachnospiraceae, and less Rikenellaceae and Ruminococcus. No clustering according to delivery method as determined by principal component analysis of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis profiles was evident in adult mice. However, the adult C-section-born mice had lower proportions of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells, tolerogenic CD103(+) dendritic cells, and less Il10 gene expression in mesenteric lymph nodes and spleens. This demonstrates long-term systemic effect on the regulatory immune system that was also evident in NOD mice, a model of type 1 diabetes, born by C-section. However, no effect of delivery mode was seen on diabetes incidence or insulitis development. In conclusion, the first exposure to microorganisms seems to be crucial for the early life gut microbiota and priming of regulatory immune system in mice, and mode of delivery strongly influences this.",
keywords = "Adaptive Immunity, Animals, Bacteroides, Cesarean Section, Clostridium, Diabetes Mellitus, Experimental, Female, Intestines, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred BALB C, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Inbred NOD, Microbiota, Mucous Membrane, Ruminococcus, T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory",
author = "Hansen, {Camilla H{\o}jgaard} and Andersen, {Line S F} and Lukasz Krych and Metzdorff, {Stine Broeng} and Hasselby, {Jane P} and S{\o}ren Skov and Nielsen, {Dennis S} and Karsten Buschard and Hansen, {Lars H} and Hansen, {Axel K}",
note = "Copyright {\circledC} 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.",
year = "2014",
month = "8",
day = "1",
doi = "10.4049/jimmunol.1400085",
language = "English",
volume = "193",
pages = "1213--22",
journal = "Journal of Immunology",
issn = "0022-1767",
publisher = "American Association of Immunologists",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Mode of delivery shapes gut colonization pattern and modulates regulatory immunity in mice

AU - Hansen, Camilla Højgaard

AU - Andersen, Line S F

AU - Krych, Lukasz

AU - Metzdorff, Stine Broeng

AU - Hasselby, Jane P

AU - Skov, Søren

AU - Nielsen, Dennis S

AU - Buschard, Karsten

AU - Hansen, Lars H

AU - Hansen, Axel K

N1 - Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

PY - 2014/8/1

Y1 - 2014/8/1

N2 - Delivery mode has been associated with long-term changes in gut microbiota composition and more recently also with changes in the immune system. This has further been suggested to link Cesarean section (C-section) with an increased risk for development of immune-mediated diseases such as type 1 diabetes. In this study, we demonstrate that both C-section and cross-fostering with a genetically distinct strain influence the gut microbiota composition and immune key markers in mice. Gut microbiota profiling by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and 454/FLX-based 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing revealed that mice born by C-section had a distinct bacterial profile at weaning characterized by higher abundance of Bacteroides and Lachnospiraceae, and less Rikenellaceae and Ruminococcus. No clustering according to delivery method as determined by principal component analysis of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis profiles was evident in adult mice. However, the adult C-section-born mice had lower proportions of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells, tolerogenic CD103(+) dendritic cells, and less Il10 gene expression in mesenteric lymph nodes and spleens. This demonstrates long-term systemic effect on the regulatory immune system that was also evident in NOD mice, a model of type 1 diabetes, born by C-section. However, no effect of delivery mode was seen on diabetes incidence or insulitis development. In conclusion, the first exposure to microorganisms seems to be crucial for the early life gut microbiota and priming of regulatory immune system in mice, and mode of delivery strongly influences this.

AB - Delivery mode has been associated with long-term changes in gut microbiota composition and more recently also with changes in the immune system. This has further been suggested to link Cesarean section (C-section) with an increased risk for development of immune-mediated diseases such as type 1 diabetes. In this study, we demonstrate that both C-section and cross-fostering with a genetically distinct strain influence the gut microbiota composition and immune key markers in mice. Gut microbiota profiling by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and 454/FLX-based 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing revealed that mice born by C-section had a distinct bacterial profile at weaning characterized by higher abundance of Bacteroides and Lachnospiraceae, and less Rikenellaceae and Ruminococcus. No clustering according to delivery method as determined by principal component analysis of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis profiles was evident in adult mice. However, the adult C-section-born mice had lower proportions of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells, tolerogenic CD103(+) dendritic cells, and less Il10 gene expression in mesenteric lymph nodes and spleens. This demonstrates long-term systemic effect on the regulatory immune system that was also evident in NOD mice, a model of type 1 diabetes, born by C-section. However, no effect of delivery mode was seen on diabetes incidence or insulitis development. In conclusion, the first exposure to microorganisms seems to be crucial for the early life gut microbiota and priming of regulatory immune system in mice, and mode of delivery strongly influences this.

KW - Adaptive Immunity

KW - Animals

KW - Bacteroides

KW - Cesarean Section

KW - Clostridium

KW - Diabetes Mellitus, Experimental

KW - Female

KW - Intestines

KW - Male

KW - Mice

KW - Mice, Inbred BALB C

KW - Mice, Inbred C57BL

KW - Mice, Inbred NOD

KW - Microbiota

KW - Mucous Membrane

KW - Ruminococcus

KW - T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory

U2 - 10.4049/jimmunol.1400085

DO - 10.4049/jimmunol.1400085

M3 - Journal article

VL - 193

SP - 1213

EP - 1222

JO - Journal of Immunology

JF - Journal of Immunology

SN - 0022-1767

IS - 3

ER -

ID: 44705342