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Udgivet

Microscopic and Submicroscopic Asymptomatic Plasmodium falciparum Infections in Ghanaian Children and Protection against Febrile Malaria

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

DOI

  1. Peripheral Merozoite Surface Proteins Are Targets of Naturally Acquired Immunity against Malaria in both India and Ghana

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  2. Plasmodium falciparum Clag9-Associated PfRhopH Complex Is Involved in Merozoite Binding to Human Erythrocytes

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  1. Capsid-like particles decorated with the SARS-CoV-2 receptor-binding domain elicit strong virus neutralization activity

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  2. A Reproducible and Scalable Process for Manufacturing a Pfs48/45 Based Plasmodium falciparum Transmission-Blocking Vaccine

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  3. Peripheral Merozoite Surface Proteins Are Targets of Naturally Acquired Immunity against Malaria in both India and Ghana

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  • Bright Adu
  • Quratul-Ain Issahaque
  • Tracy Sarkodie-Addo
  • Selassie Kumordjie
  • Eric Kyei-Baafour
  • Caleb K Sinclear
  • Sophia Eyia-Ampah
  • Eunice Owusu-Yeboa
  • Michael Theisen
  • Daniel Dodoo
Vis graf over relationer

Naturally acquired immunity to Plasmodium falciparum malaria is thought to be nonsterile and sustained by persistence of low-level parasitemia. This study assessed the association between baseline microscopic and submicroscopic asymptomatic P. falciparum infections and antimalarial antibody levels and whether these parasitemia modify protective associations between antibody levels and malaria in Ghanaian children. Healthy children (N = 973, aged 0.5 to 12 years) were recruited into a 50-week longitudinal malaria cohort study from January 2016 to January 2017. Baseline asymptomatic parasitemia were determined by microscopy (microscopic parasitemia) and PCR (submicroscopic parasitemia), and antibody levels against crude schizont antigens were measured by enzyme-limited immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Antibody levels, parasite diversity, and risk of malaria in the ensuing transmission season were compared among children who had baseline asymptomatic microscopic or submicroscopic or no P. falciparum infections. Of the 99 asymptomatic baseline infections, 46 (46.5%) were microscopic and 53 (53.5%), submicroscopic. Cox regression analysis adjusting for age group, sex and community found a strong association between both baseline microscopic (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.36, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 0.21 to 0.63; P < 0.001) and submicroscopic (HR = 0.22, 95% CI = 0.11 to 0.44; P < 0.001) asymptomatic parasitemia and a reduced risk of febrile malaria compared to those who were uninfected at baseline. Baseline asymptomatic submicroscopic parasitemia had a significant effect on associations between antischizont antibodies and protection against febrile malaria (P < 0.001; likelihood ratio test). The study found both baseline P. falciparum asymptomatic microscopic and more strongly submicroscopic infections to be associated with protection against febrile malaria in the ensuing transmission season. This could have important implications for malaria seroepidemiological studies and vaccine trials.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftInfection and Immunity
Vol/bind88
Udgave nummer10
ISSN0019-9567
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 18 sep. 2020

Bibliografisk note

Copyright © 2020 Adu et al.

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