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Melatonin and cortisol profiles in the absence of light perception

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Aubin, S ; Kupers, R ; Ptito, M ; Jennum, P. / Melatonin and cortisol profiles in the absence of light perception. I: Behavioural Brain Research. 2017 ; Bind 317. s. 515-521.

Bibtex

@article{7ceb2728a89e465389ba419b539f5615,
title = "Melatonin and cortisol profiles in the absence of light perception",
abstract = "As light plays an important role in the synchronisation of the internal biological clock to the environmental day/night schedule, we compared the 24-h profiles of biological circadian markers in blind and normal sighted individuals. Salivary melatonin and cortisol concentrations were collected every two hours in eleven blind subjects, reporting no conscious light perception, and eleven age- and sex-matched normal sighted controls. Timing of melatonin onset and associated cortisol quiescence period confirm an increased incidence of abnormal circadian patterns in blindness. Additionally, blind subjects showed a greater overall melatonin concentration throughout the 24-h period. Cortisol profiles, including concentration and morning cortisol peaks, on the other hand, did not differ between blind and sighted individuals. These findings support previous reports of an increase in abnormal circadian rhythms and the absence of the entrainment properties of light in blindness.",
author = "S Aubin and R Kupers and M Ptito and P Jennum",
note = "Copyright {\circledC} 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.",
year = "2017",
month = "1",
day = "15",
doi = "10.1016/j.bbr.2016.09.060",
language = "English",
volume = "317",
pages = "515--521",
journal = "Behavioural Brain Research",
issn = "0166-4328",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Melatonin and cortisol profiles in the absence of light perception

AU - Aubin, S

AU - Kupers, R

AU - Ptito, M

AU - Jennum, P

N1 - Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

PY - 2017/1/15

Y1 - 2017/1/15

N2 - As light plays an important role in the synchronisation of the internal biological clock to the environmental day/night schedule, we compared the 24-h profiles of biological circadian markers in blind and normal sighted individuals. Salivary melatonin and cortisol concentrations were collected every two hours in eleven blind subjects, reporting no conscious light perception, and eleven age- and sex-matched normal sighted controls. Timing of melatonin onset and associated cortisol quiescence period confirm an increased incidence of abnormal circadian patterns in blindness. Additionally, blind subjects showed a greater overall melatonin concentration throughout the 24-h period. Cortisol profiles, including concentration and morning cortisol peaks, on the other hand, did not differ between blind and sighted individuals. These findings support previous reports of an increase in abnormal circadian rhythms and the absence of the entrainment properties of light in blindness.

AB - As light plays an important role in the synchronisation of the internal biological clock to the environmental day/night schedule, we compared the 24-h profiles of biological circadian markers in blind and normal sighted individuals. Salivary melatonin and cortisol concentrations were collected every two hours in eleven blind subjects, reporting no conscious light perception, and eleven age- and sex-matched normal sighted controls. Timing of melatonin onset and associated cortisol quiescence period confirm an increased incidence of abnormal circadian patterns in blindness. Additionally, blind subjects showed a greater overall melatonin concentration throughout the 24-h period. Cortisol profiles, including concentration and morning cortisol peaks, on the other hand, did not differ between blind and sighted individuals. These findings support previous reports of an increase in abnormal circadian rhythms and the absence of the entrainment properties of light in blindness.

U2 - 10.1016/j.bbr.2016.09.060

DO - 10.1016/j.bbr.2016.09.060

M3 - Journal article

VL - 317

SP - 515

EP - 521

JO - Behavioural Brain Research

JF - Behavioural Brain Research

SN - 0166-4328

ER -

ID: 49649314