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Matrix structure of dairy products results in different postprandial lipid responses: a randomized crossover trial

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  • Louise Kjølbæk
  • Jesper M Schmidt
  • Emilien Rouy
  • Klaus J Jensen
  • Arne Astrup
  • Hanne C Bertram
  • Marianne Hammershøj
  • Anne Raben
Vis graf over relationer

BACKGROUND: The dairy matrix may influence digestion and absorption of lipids and thereby risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). However, few postprandial studies have compared dairy products that differed only in terms of their matrix.

OBJECTIVES: We aimed to investigate acute 8-h postprandial lipid, glycemic, and appetite responses after intake of isoenergetic dairy meals with different matrixes, but similar nutritional composition.

METHODS: Twenty-five normal-weight men (18-40 y old) were enrolled in a randomized controlled crossover trial. On 4 test days, a meal with 1 of 4 dairy products was served: cheddar cheese (Cheese), homogenized Cheese (Hom. Cheese), micellar casein isolate (MCI) with cream (MCI Drink), and a gel produced from the MCI Drink by addition of Glucono Delta-Lactone (MCI Gel). The fat- and protein-matched dairy products differed in terms of their casein network, fat droplet size, and/or texture. Blood biochemistry and appetite responses were collected.

RESULTS: Eighteen participants completed the trial. Postprandial triglycerides (TGs) (primary outcome) increased by (mean ± SEM) 0.24 ± 0.07 and 0.19 ± 0.07 mmol/L after MCI Gel compared with Cheese and Hom. Cheese, respectively (both P ≤ 0.05). Likewise, MCI Gel increased TG incremental AUC compared with Cheese and Hom. Cheese (both P < 0.05), and peak compared with Cheese (P < 0.05). ApoB-48 (primary outcome) was unaffected by dairy matrix. For free fatty acids (FFAs), glucose, and insulin, time × meal interactions were observed (all P < 0.001). During the first 2 h, FFAs were lower for Cheese than for MCI products, whereas the opposite was observed for glucose and insulin.

CONCLUSIONS: Postprandial TG but not apoB-48 response was higher after MCI Gel, indicating that the type of casein network influences lipid responses. This suggests that the dairy matrix may also affect risk factors for CVDs. Reducing fat droplet size (i.e., Hom. Cheese) did not affect blood biochemistry.This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT03656367.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftThe American journal of clinical nutrition
Vol/bind114
Udgave nummer5
Sider (fra-til)1729-1742
Antal sider14
ISSN0002-9165
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 8 nov. 2021

Bibliografisk note

© The Author(s) 2021. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Society for Nutrition.

ID: 69024042