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Low-Grade Inflammation in the Association between Mild-to-Moderate Hypertriglyceridemia and Risk of Acute Pancreatitis: A Study of More Than 115000 Individuals from the General Population

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@article{0e30aa7a04ed427b8b13b26451ce106c,
title = "Low-Grade Inflammation in the Association between Mild-to-Moderate Hypertriglyceridemia and Risk of Acute Pancreatitis: A Study of More Than 115000 Individuals from the General Population",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: How mild-to-moderate hypertriglyceridemia (2–10 mmol/L; 177– 886 mg/dL) potentially causes acute pancreatitis is unknown; however, cellular studies indicate that inflammation might be a driver of disease progression. We tested the hypotheses that (a) mild-to-moderate hypertriglyceridemia is associated with low-grade inflammation and that (b) the association between mild-to-moderate hypertriglyceridemia and risk of acute pancreatitis depends on low-grade inflammation. METHODS: From the Copenhagen General Population Study and the Copenhagen City Heart Study, 117 865 men and women 20–100+ years of age with measurements of nonfasting plasma triglycerides at baseline were followed prospectively for development of acute pancreatitis. RESULTS: After multivariable adjustment, a 1 mmol/L (89 mg/dL) higher nonfasting triglyceride concentration was associated with 17% (95% CI, 16%–18%, P = 3 × 10 -17 ) higher plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) and a 4.2% (4.0%–4.4%, P = 6 × 10 -17 ) higher blood leukocyte count. Higher concentrations of nonfasting triglycerides were associated almost linearly with higher risk of acute pancreatitis (P for trend = 5 × 10 -6 ), with hazard ratios of 1.5 (95% CI, 0.9–2.5), 2.0 (95% CI, 1.1–3.6), 2.2 (95% CI, 1.0–4.7), 4.2 (95% CI, 1.6–11.5), and 7.7 (95% CI, 3.0–19.8) in individuals with nonfasting triglycerides of 1.00–1.99 mmol/L (89–176 mg/dL; 46% of the population), 2.00–2.99 mmol/L (177–265 mg/dL; 17%), 3.00–3.99 mmol/L (266–353 mg/dL; 6%), 4.00–4.99 mmol/L (354–442 mg/dL; 2%), and ≥5mmol/L(443 mg/dL; 2%), respectively, vs individuals with <1 mmol/L (89 mg/dL; 27%). The association with risk of acute pancreatitis appeared more pronounced in individuals with CRP of ≥1.39 mg/L (P for trend = 0.001) and leukocytes of ≥7 × 10 9 /L (P = 2 × 10 -4 ) than in those with CRP <1.39 mg/L (P = 0.03) and leukocytes <7 × 10 9 /L (P = 0.04); however, there was no formal evidence of statistical interaction (P = 0.38 for CRP and P = 0.41 for leukocytes). CONCLUSIONS: Mild-to-moderate hypertriglyceridemia is associated with low-grade inflammation and higher risk of acute pancreatitis. The association between mild-to-moderate hypertriglyceridemia and risk of acute pancreatitis is possibly partly mediated by low-grade inflammation. ",
author = "Hansen, {Signe E J} and Madsen, {Christian M} and Anette Varbo and Nordestgaard, {B{\o}rge G}",
note = "{\textcopyright} 2018 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.",
year = "2019",
month = feb,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1373/clinchem.2018.294926",
language = "English",
volume = "65",
pages = "321--332",
journal = "Clinical Chemistry",
issn = "0009-9147",
publisher = "American Association for Clinical Chemistry, Inc",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Low-Grade Inflammation in the Association between Mild-to-Moderate Hypertriglyceridemia and Risk of Acute Pancreatitis

T2 - A Study of More Than 115000 Individuals from the General Population

AU - Hansen, Signe E J

AU - Madsen, Christian M

AU - Varbo, Anette

AU - Nordestgaard, Børge G

N1 - © 2018 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

PY - 2019/2/1

Y1 - 2019/2/1

N2 - BACKGROUND: How mild-to-moderate hypertriglyceridemia (2–10 mmol/L; 177– 886 mg/dL) potentially causes acute pancreatitis is unknown; however, cellular studies indicate that inflammation might be a driver of disease progression. We tested the hypotheses that (a) mild-to-moderate hypertriglyceridemia is associated with low-grade inflammation and that (b) the association between mild-to-moderate hypertriglyceridemia and risk of acute pancreatitis depends on low-grade inflammation. METHODS: From the Copenhagen General Population Study and the Copenhagen City Heart Study, 117 865 men and women 20–100+ years of age with measurements of nonfasting plasma triglycerides at baseline were followed prospectively for development of acute pancreatitis. RESULTS: After multivariable adjustment, a 1 mmol/L (89 mg/dL) higher nonfasting triglyceride concentration was associated with 17% (95% CI, 16%–18%, P = 3 × 10 -17 ) higher plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) and a 4.2% (4.0%–4.4%, P = 6 × 10 -17 ) higher blood leukocyte count. Higher concentrations of nonfasting triglycerides were associated almost linearly with higher risk of acute pancreatitis (P for trend = 5 × 10 -6 ), with hazard ratios of 1.5 (95% CI, 0.9–2.5), 2.0 (95% CI, 1.1–3.6), 2.2 (95% CI, 1.0–4.7), 4.2 (95% CI, 1.6–11.5), and 7.7 (95% CI, 3.0–19.8) in individuals with nonfasting triglycerides of 1.00–1.99 mmol/L (89–176 mg/dL; 46% of the population), 2.00–2.99 mmol/L (177–265 mg/dL; 17%), 3.00–3.99 mmol/L (266–353 mg/dL; 6%), 4.00–4.99 mmol/L (354–442 mg/dL; 2%), and ≥5mmol/L(443 mg/dL; 2%), respectively, vs individuals with <1 mmol/L (89 mg/dL; 27%). The association with risk of acute pancreatitis appeared more pronounced in individuals with CRP of ≥1.39 mg/L (P for trend = 0.001) and leukocytes of ≥7 × 10 9 /L (P = 2 × 10 -4 ) than in those with CRP <1.39 mg/L (P = 0.03) and leukocytes <7 × 10 9 /L (P = 0.04); however, there was no formal evidence of statistical interaction (P = 0.38 for CRP and P = 0.41 for leukocytes). CONCLUSIONS: Mild-to-moderate hypertriglyceridemia is associated with low-grade inflammation and higher risk of acute pancreatitis. The association between mild-to-moderate hypertriglyceridemia and risk of acute pancreatitis is possibly partly mediated by low-grade inflammation.

AB - BACKGROUND: How mild-to-moderate hypertriglyceridemia (2–10 mmol/L; 177– 886 mg/dL) potentially causes acute pancreatitis is unknown; however, cellular studies indicate that inflammation might be a driver of disease progression. We tested the hypotheses that (a) mild-to-moderate hypertriglyceridemia is associated with low-grade inflammation and that (b) the association between mild-to-moderate hypertriglyceridemia and risk of acute pancreatitis depends on low-grade inflammation. METHODS: From the Copenhagen General Population Study and the Copenhagen City Heart Study, 117 865 men and women 20–100+ years of age with measurements of nonfasting plasma triglycerides at baseline were followed prospectively for development of acute pancreatitis. RESULTS: After multivariable adjustment, a 1 mmol/L (89 mg/dL) higher nonfasting triglyceride concentration was associated with 17% (95% CI, 16%–18%, P = 3 × 10 -17 ) higher plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) and a 4.2% (4.0%–4.4%, P = 6 × 10 -17 ) higher blood leukocyte count. Higher concentrations of nonfasting triglycerides were associated almost linearly with higher risk of acute pancreatitis (P for trend = 5 × 10 -6 ), with hazard ratios of 1.5 (95% CI, 0.9–2.5), 2.0 (95% CI, 1.1–3.6), 2.2 (95% CI, 1.0–4.7), 4.2 (95% CI, 1.6–11.5), and 7.7 (95% CI, 3.0–19.8) in individuals with nonfasting triglycerides of 1.00–1.99 mmol/L (89–176 mg/dL; 46% of the population), 2.00–2.99 mmol/L (177–265 mg/dL; 17%), 3.00–3.99 mmol/L (266–353 mg/dL; 6%), 4.00–4.99 mmol/L (354–442 mg/dL; 2%), and ≥5mmol/L(443 mg/dL; 2%), respectively, vs individuals with <1 mmol/L (89 mg/dL; 27%). The association with risk of acute pancreatitis appeared more pronounced in individuals with CRP of ≥1.39 mg/L (P for trend = 0.001) and leukocytes of ≥7 × 10 9 /L (P = 2 × 10 -4 ) than in those with CRP <1.39 mg/L (P = 0.03) and leukocytes <7 × 10 9 /L (P = 0.04); however, there was no formal evidence of statistical interaction (P = 0.38 for CRP and P = 0.41 for leukocytes). CONCLUSIONS: Mild-to-moderate hypertriglyceridemia is associated with low-grade inflammation and higher risk of acute pancreatitis. The association between mild-to-moderate hypertriglyceridemia and risk of acute pancreatitis is possibly partly mediated by low-grade inflammation.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85060624321&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1373/clinchem.2018.294926

DO - 10.1373/clinchem.2018.294926

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 30518661

VL - 65

SP - 321

EP - 332

JO - Clinical Chemistry

JF - Clinical Chemistry

SN - 0009-9147

IS - 2

ER -

ID: 56612016