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Long-term mortality in the Intermediate care after emergency abdominal surgery (InCare) trial - a post-hoc follow-up study

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@article{13802c51ee414953abeffb9c8ccfba7a,
title = "Long-term mortality in the Intermediate care after emergency abdominal surgery (InCare) trial - a post-hoc follow-up study",
abstract = "Background: Patients undergoing emergency abdominal surgery are at high risk of post-operative complications. Although post-operative treatment at an intermediate care unit may improve early outcome, there is a lack of studies on the long-term effects of such therapy. The aim of this study was to assess the long-term effect of intermediate care versus standard surgical ward care on mortality in the Intermediate Care After Emergency Abdominal Surgery (InCare) trial. Methods: We included adult patients undergoing emergency major laparoscopy or laparotomy with an Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score of 10 or more, who participated in the InCare trial from October 2010 to November 2012. In the InCare trial, patients were randomized to either post-operative intermediate care or standard surgical ward care. The primary outcome was time to death within 6 years after surgery. We assessed mortality with Coxregression analysis. Results: A total of 286 patients were included. The all-cause 6-year landmark mortality was 52.8% (76 of 144 patients) in the intermediate care group and 47.9% (68 of 142 patients) in the ward care group. There was no statistically significant difference in mortality risk between the two groups (hazard ratio 1.06 (95% confidence interval 0.76-1.47), P =.73). Conclusion: We found no statistically significant difference in 6-year mortality between patients randomized to post-operative intermediate care or ward care after emergency abdominal surgery. However, we detected an absolute mortality risk reduction of 5% in favour of ward care, possibly due to random error.",
author = "Hansted, {Anna K} and M{\o}ller, {Morten H} and M{\o}ller, {Ann M} and J{\o}rn Wetterslev and Jacob Rosenberg and Jorgensen, {Lars Nannestad} and Tina Waldau and Morten Vester-Andersen",
note = "{\textcopyright} 2020 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.",
year = "2020",
month = sep,
doi = "10.1111/aas.13613",
language = "English",
volume = "64",
pages = "1100--1105",
journal = "Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica",
issn = "0001-5172",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell Munksgaard",
number = "8",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Long-term mortality in the Intermediate care after emergency abdominal surgery (InCare) trial - a post-hoc follow-up study

AU - Hansted, Anna K

AU - Møller, Morten H

AU - Møller, Ann M

AU - Wetterslev, Jørn

AU - Rosenberg, Jacob

AU - Jorgensen, Lars Nannestad

AU - Waldau, Tina

AU - Vester-Andersen, Morten

N1 - © 2020 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

PY - 2020/9

Y1 - 2020/9

N2 - Background: Patients undergoing emergency abdominal surgery are at high risk of post-operative complications. Although post-operative treatment at an intermediate care unit may improve early outcome, there is a lack of studies on the long-term effects of such therapy. The aim of this study was to assess the long-term effect of intermediate care versus standard surgical ward care on mortality in the Intermediate Care After Emergency Abdominal Surgery (InCare) trial. Methods: We included adult patients undergoing emergency major laparoscopy or laparotomy with an Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score of 10 or more, who participated in the InCare trial from October 2010 to November 2012. In the InCare trial, patients were randomized to either post-operative intermediate care or standard surgical ward care. The primary outcome was time to death within 6 years after surgery. We assessed mortality with Coxregression analysis. Results: A total of 286 patients were included. The all-cause 6-year landmark mortality was 52.8% (76 of 144 patients) in the intermediate care group and 47.9% (68 of 142 patients) in the ward care group. There was no statistically significant difference in mortality risk between the two groups (hazard ratio 1.06 (95% confidence interval 0.76-1.47), P =.73). Conclusion: We found no statistically significant difference in 6-year mortality between patients randomized to post-operative intermediate care or ward care after emergency abdominal surgery. However, we detected an absolute mortality risk reduction of 5% in favour of ward care, possibly due to random error.

AB - Background: Patients undergoing emergency abdominal surgery are at high risk of post-operative complications. Although post-operative treatment at an intermediate care unit may improve early outcome, there is a lack of studies on the long-term effects of such therapy. The aim of this study was to assess the long-term effect of intermediate care versus standard surgical ward care on mortality in the Intermediate Care After Emergency Abdominal Surgery (InCare) trial. Methods: We included adult patients undergoing emergency major laparoscopy or laparotomy with an Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score of 10 or more, who participated in the InCare trial from October 2010 to November 2012. In the InCare trial, patients were randomized to either post-operative intermediate care or standard surgical ward care. The primary outcome was time to death within 6 years after surgery. We assessed mortality with Coxregression analysis. Results: A total of 286 patients were included. The all-cause 6-year landmark mortality was 52.8% (76 of 144 patients) in the intermediate care group and 47.9% (68 of 142 patients) in the ward care group. There was no statistically significant difference in mortality risk between the two groups (hazard ratio 1.06 (95% confidence interval 0.76-1.47), P =.73). Conclusion: We found no statistically significant difference in 6-year mortality between patients randomized to post-operative intermediate care or ward care after emergency abdominal surgery. However, we detected an absolute mortality risk reduction of 5% in favour of ward care, possibly due to random error.

U2 - 10.1111/aas.13613

DO - 10.1111/aas.13613

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 32386082

VL - 64

SP - 1100

EP - 1105

JO - Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica

JF - Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica

SN - 0001-5172

IS - 8

ER -

ID: 59910378