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Region Hovedstaden - en del af Københavns Universitetshospital
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Liver and Muscle Contribute Differently to the Plasma Acylcarnitine Pool During Fasting and Exercise in Humans

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BACKGROUND: Plasma acylcarnitine levels are elevated by physiological conditions such as fasting and exercise but also in states of insulin resistance and obesity.

AIM: To elucidate the contribution of liver and skeletal muscle to plasma acylcarnitines in the fasting state and during exercise in humans.

METHODS: In 2 independent studies, young healthy males were fasted overnight and performed an acute bout of exercise to investigate either acylcarnitines in skeletal muscle biopsies and arterial-to-venous plasma differences over the exercising and resting leg (n = 9) or the flux over the hepato-splanchnic bed (n = 10).

RESULTS: In the fasting state, a pronounced release of C2- and C3-carnitines from the hepato-splanchnic bed and an uptake of free carnitine by the legs were detected. Exercise further increased the release of C3-carnitine from the hepato-splanchnic bed and the uptake of free carnitine in the exercising leg. In plasma and in the exercising muscle, exercise induced an increase of most acylcarnitines followed by a rapid decline to preexercise values during recovery. In contrast, free carnitine was decreased in the exercising muscle and quickly restored thereafter. C8-, C10-, C10:1-, C12-, and C12:1-carnitines were released from the exercising leg and simultaneously; C6, C8, C10, C10:1, C14, and C16:1 were taken up by the hepato-splanchnic.

CONCLUSION: These data provide novel insight to the organo-specific release/uptake of acylcarnitines. The liver is a major contributor to systemic short chain acylcarnitines, whereas the muscle tissue releases mostly medium chain acylcarnitines during exercise, indicating that other tissues are contributing to the systemic increase in long chain acylcarnitines.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftJournal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
Vol/bind101
Udgave nummer12
Sider (fra-til)5044-5052
Antal sider9
ISSN0021-972X
DOI
StatusUdgivet - dec. 2016

ID: 49297477