Forskning
Udskriv Udskriv
Switch language
Region Hovedstaden - en del af Københavns Universitetshospital
Udgivet

Lipoprotein(a) levels at birth and in early childhood: The COMPARE Study

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

DOI

  1. Patients with cirrhosis have elevated bone turnover but normal hepatic production of osteoprotegerin

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  2. Colonic lactulose fermentation has no impact on glucagon-like peptide-1 and peptide-YY secretion in healthy young men

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  3. Entero-pancreatic hormone secretion, gastric emptying, and glucose absorption after frequently sampled meal tests

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  4. PaTH Forward: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Phase 2 Trial of TransCon PTH in Adult Hypoparathyroidism

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  5. Vitamin D supplementation improves fasting insulin levels and HDL cholesterol in infertile men

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  1. Severity of anaemia and association with all-cause mortality in patients with medically managed left-sided endocarditis

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  2. Monocyte count and soluble markers of monocyte activation in people living with HIV and uninfected controls

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  3. Acute symptoms in SARS-CoV-2 positive adolescents aged 15-18 years - Results from a Danish national cross-sectional survey study

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  4. Self-reported and genetically predicted coffee consumption and smoking in dementia: A Mendelian randomization study

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Vis graf over relationer

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: High lipoprotein(a) is a genetically determined causal risk factor for cardiovascular disease, and 20% of the adult population has high levels (ie, >42 mg/dL, >88 nmol/L). We investigated whether early life lipoprotein(a) levels measured in cord blood may serve as a proxy for neonatal venous blood levels, whether lipoprotein(a) birth levels (ie, cord or venous) predict levels later in life, and whether early life and parental levels correlate.

METHODS: The Compare study is a prospective cohort study of newborns (N = 450) from Copenhagen, Denmark, including blood sampling of parents. Plasma lipoprotein(a) was measured in cord blood (N = 402), neonatal venous blood (N = 356), and at 2 (N = 320) and 15 months follow-up (N = 148) of infants, and in parents (N = 705).

RESULTS: Mean lipoprotein(a) levels were 2.2 (95% CI, 1.9-2.5), 2.4 (2.0-2.7), 4.1 (3.4-4.9), and 14.6 (11.4-17.9) mg/dL in cord, neonatal venous, and 2- and 15-month venous samples, respectively. Lipoprotein(a) levels in cord blood correlated strongly with neonatal venous blood levels (R2 = 0.95, P < 0.001) and neonatal levels correlated moderately with 2- and 15-month levels (R2 = 0.68 and 0.67, both P < 0.001). Birth levels ≥ 90th percentile predicted lipoprotein(a) > 42 mg/dL at 15 months with positive predictive values of 89% and 85% for neonatal venous and cord blood. Neonatal and infant levels correlated weakly with parental levels, most pronounced at 15 months (R2 = 0.22, P < 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS: Lipoprotein(a) levels are low in early life, cord blood may serve as a proxy for neonatal venous blood, and birth levels ≥ 90th percentile can identify newborns at risk of developing high levels.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftThe Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism
Vol/bind107
Udgave nummer2
Sider (fra-til)324-335
Antal sider12
ISSN0021-972X
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 18 jan. 2022

Bibliografisk note

© The Author(s) 2021. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Endocrine Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

ID: 72162413