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Laminar airflow versus turbulent airflow in simulated total hip arthroplasty: measurements of colony-forming units, particles, and energy consumption

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@article{45221a455d29457b82e47679910e98d6,
title = "Laminar airflow versus turbulent airflow in simulated total hip arthroplasty: measurements of colony-forming units, particles, and energy consumption",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: The optimal type of ventilation in operating theatres for joint arthroplasty has been debated for decades. Recently, the World Health Organization changed its recommendations based on articles that have since been criticized. The economic and environmental impact of ventilation is also currently an important research topic but has not been well investigated.AIM: To compare how large, high-volume, laminar airflow (LAF) and turbulent airflow (TAF) ventilation systems perform during standardized simulated total hip arthroplasty (THA), as they pertain to colony-forming units (cfu), particle counts, and energy consumption.METHODS: Two identical operating theatres were used to perform simulated THA. The only difference was that one was equipped with LAF and the other with TAF. Cfu and particles were collected from key points in the operating theatre, and energy was measured for each simulation. Thirty-two simulations were done in total.FINDINGS: LAF had significantly reduced cfu and particle count when compared with TAF, at both 100% and 50% air influx. Furthermore, it was shown that lowering the air influx by 50% in LAF did not significantly affect cfu or particles, although reducing the fresh air influx from 100% to 50% significantly lowered the energy consumption. Most simulations in TAF did not meet the cleanroom requirements.CONCLUSION: Cfu were significantly lower in LAF at both 100% and 50% air influx. It is possible to reduce fresh air influx in LAF operating theatres by 50%, significantly reducing energy consumption, while still maintaining cfu and particle counts below the ISO classification threshold required for THA surgery.",
keywords = "Air Microbiology, Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip, Environment, Controlled, Humans, Operating Rooms, Stem Cells, Surgical Wound Infection, Ventilation, Energy consumption, Particle count, Laminar airflow, Turbulent airflow, Total hip arthroplasty",
author = "Marsault, {L V} and C Ravn and A Overgaard and Frich, {L H} and M Olsen and T Anstensrud and J Nielsen and S Overgaard",
note = "Copyright {\textcopyright} 2021 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.",
year = "2021",
month = sep,
doi = "10.1016/j.jhin.2021.06.009",
language = "English",
volume = "115",
pages = "117--123",
journal = "Journal of Hospital Infection",
issn = "0195-6701",
publisher = "W.B./Saunders Co. Ltd",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Laminar airflow versus turbulent airflow in simulated total hip arthroplasty

T2 - measurements of colony-forming units, particles, and energy consumption

AU - Marsault, L V

AU - Ravn, C

AU - Overgaard, A

AU - Frich, L H

AU - Olsen, M

AU - Anstensrud, T

AU - Nielsen, J

AU - Overgaard, S

N1 - Copyright © 2021 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

PY - 2021/9

Y1 - 2021/9

N2 - BACKGROUND: The optimal type of ventilation in operating theatres for joint arthroplasty has been debated for decades. Recently, the World Health Organization changed its recommendations based on articles that have since been criticized. The economic and environmental impact of ventilation is also currently an important research topic but has not been well investigated.AIM: To compare how large, high-volume, laminar airflow (LAF) and turbulent airflow (TAF) ventilation systems perform during standardized simulated total hip arthroplasty (THA), as they pertain to colony-forming units (cfu), particle counts, and energy consumption.METHODS: Two identical operating theatres were used to perform simulated THA. The only difference was that one was equipped with LAF and the other with TAF. Cfu and particles were collected from key points in the operating theatre, and energy was measured for each simulation. Thirty-two simulations were done in total.FINDINGS: LAF had significantly reduced cfu and particle count when compared with TAF, at both 100% and 50% air influx. Furthermore, it was shown that lowering the air influx by 50% in LAF did not significantly affect cfu or particles, although reducing the fresh air influx from 100% to 50% significantly lowered the energy consumption. Most simulations in TAF did not meet the cleanroom requirements.CONCLUSION: Cfu were significantly lower in LAF at both 100% and 50% air influx. It is possible to reduce fresh air influx in LAF operating theatres by 50%, significantly reducing energy consumption, while still maintaining cfu and particle counts below the ISO classification threshold required for THA surgery.

AB - BACKGROUND: The optimal type of ventilation in operating theatres for joint arthroplasty has been debated for decades. Recently, the World Health Organization changed its recommendations based on articles that have since been criticized. The economic and environmental impact of ventilation is also currently an important research topic but has not been well investigated.AIM: To compare how large, high-volume, laminar airflow (LAF) and turbulent airflow (TAF) ventilation systems perform during standardized simulated total hip arthroplasty (THA), as they pertain to colony-forming units (cfu), particle counts, and energy consumption.METHODS: Two identical operating theatres were used to perform simulated THA. The only difference was that one was equipped with LAF and the other with TAF. Cfu and particles were collected from key points in the operating theatre, and energy was measured for each simulation. Thirty-two simulations were done in total.FINDINGS: LAF had significantly reduced cfu and particle count when compared with TAF, at both 100% and 50% air influx. Furthermore, it was shown that lowering the air influx by 50% in LAF did not significantly affect cfu or particles, although reducing the fresh air influx from 100% to 50% significantly lowered the energy consumption. Most simulations in TAF did not meet the cleanroom requirements.CONCLUSION: Cfu were significantly lower in LAF at both 100% and 50% air influx. It is possible to reduce fresh air influx in LAF operating theatres by 50%, significantly reducing energy consumption, while still maintaining cfu and particle counts below the ISO classification threshold required for THA surgery.

KW - Air Microbiology

KW - Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip

KW - Environment, Controlled

KW - Humans

KW - Operating Rooms

KW - Stem Cells

KW - Surgical Wound Infection

KW - Ventilation

KW - Energy consumption

KW - Particle count

KW - Laminar airflow

KW - Turbulent airflow

KW - Total hip arthroplasty

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85111708865&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jhin.2021.06.009

DO - 10.1016/j.jhin.2021.06.009

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 34182062

VL - 115

SP - 117

EP - 123

JO - Journal of Hospital Infection

JF - Journal of Hospital Infection

SN - 0195-6701

ER -

ID: 67448651