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Ketorolac and Other NSAIDs Increase the Risk of Anastomotic Leakage After Surgery for GEJ Cancers: a Cohort Study of 557 Patients

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@article{74ee5af807ca4eb58f7e2398f8c81727,
title = "Ketorolac and Other NSAIDs Increase the Risk of Anastomotic Leakage After Surgery for GEJ Cancers: a Cohort Study of 557 Patients",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study is to investigate the impact of ketorolac and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on anastomotic leakage after surgery for gastro-esophageal-junction cancer. Within the last two decades, the incidence of gastro-esophageal-junction cancer has increased in the western world and surgery is the curative treatment modality of choice. Anastomotic leakage is a feared complication of gastro-esophageal surgery, as it increases recurrence, morbidity, and mortality. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are widely used for postoperative pain relief. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have, however, in colorectal surgery, been shown to increase the risk of anastomotic leakage.METHOD: In a historical cohort study, we investigated the impact of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on anastomotic leakage in 557 patients undergoing surgery for gastro-esophageal-junction cancer. Data were collected from a prospective maintained database, the Danish National Patient Registry, and patient medical records. Data were analyzed using univariate and multivariate statistical models and were stratified for theoretical confounders.RESULTS: In univariate analysis, we did not observe any difference in age, gender, tobacco exposure, or comorbidity status between patients experiencing anastomotic leakage and those without. In multivariate analysis, gender, histology, and type of anastomosis proved to affect odds ratios for anastomotic leakage. After adjustment for possible confounders, we found an odds ratio of 6.05 (95{\%} confidence interval 2.71; 13.5) for ketorolac use and of 5.24 (95{\%} confidence interval 1.85; 14.8) for use of other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for anastomotic leakage during the first seven postoperative days.CONCLUSION: In the present study, we found a strong association between the postoperative use of ketorolac and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and the risk for anastomotic leakage after surgery for gastro-esophageal-junction cancers.",
keywords = "Journal Article",
author = "Fjederholt, {Kaare Terp} and Cecilie Okholm and Svendsen, {Lars Bo} and Achiam, {Michael Patrick} and Jakob Kirkeg{\aa}rd and Mortensen, {Frank Viborg}",
year = "2018",
doi = "10.1007/s11605-017-3623-7",
language = "English",
volume = "22",
pages = "587--94",
journal = "Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery",
issn = "1091-255X",
publisher = "Springer New York LLC",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Ketorolac and Other NSAIDs Increase the Risk of Anastomotic Leakage After Surgery for GEJ Cancers

T2 - a Cohort Study of 557 Patients

AU - Fjederholt, Kaare Terp

AU - Okholm, Cecilie

AU - Svendsen, Lars Bo

AU - Achiam, Michael Patrick

AU - Kirkegård, Jakob

AU - Mortensen, Frank Viborg

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study is to investigate the impact of ketorolac and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on anastomotic leakage after surgery for gastro-esophageal-junction cancer. Within the last two decades, the incidence of gastro-esophageal-junction cancer has increased in the western world and surgery is the curative treatment modality of choice. Anastomotic leakage is a feared complication of gastro-esophageal surgery, as it increases recurrence, morbidity, and mortality. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are widely used for postoperative pain relief. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have, however, in colorectal surgery, been shown to increase the risk of anastomotic leakage.METHOD: In a historical cohort study, we investigated the impact of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on anastomotic leakage in 557 patients undergoing surgery for gastro-esophageal-junction cancer. Data were collected from a prospective maintained database, the Danish National Patient Registry, and patient medical records. Data were analyzed using univariate and multivariate statistical models and were stratified for theoretical confounders.RESULTS: In univariate analysis, we did not observe any difference in age, gender, tobacco exposure, or comorbidity status between patients experiencing anastomotic leakage and those without. In multivariate analysis, gender, histology, and type of anastomosis proved to affect odds ratios for anastomotic leakage. After adjustment for possible confounders, we found an odds ratio of 6.05 (95% confidence interval 2.71; 13.5) for ketorolac use and of 5.24 (95% confidence interval 1.85; 14.8) for use of other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for anastomotic leakage during the first seven postoperative days.CONCLUSION: In the present study, we found a strong association between the postoperative use of ketorolac and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and the risk for anastomotic leakage after surgery for gastro-esophageal-junction cancers.

AB - OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study is to investigate the impact of ketorolac and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on anastomotic leakage after surgery for gastro-esophageal-junction cancer. Within the last two decades, the incidence of gastro-esophageal-junction cancer has increased in the western world and surgery is the curative treatment modality of choice. Anastomotic leakage is a feared complication of gastro-esophageal surgery, as it increases recurrence, morbidity, and mortality. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are widely used for postoperative pain relief. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have, however, in colorectal surgery, been shown to increase the risk of anastomotic leakage.METHOD: In a historical cohort study, we investigated the impact of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on anastomotic leakage in 557 patients undergoing surgery for gastro-esophageal-junction cancer. Data were collected from a prospective maintained database, the Danish National Patient Registry, and patient medical records. Data were analyzed using univariate and multivariate statistical models and were stratified for theoretical confounders.RESULTS: In univariate analysis, we did not observe any difference in age, gender, tobacco exposure, or comorbidity status between patients experiencing anastomotic leakage and those without. In multivariate analysis, gender, histology, and type of anastomosis proved to affect odds ratios for anastomotic leakage. After adjustment for possible confounders, we found an odds ratio of 6.05 (95% confidence interval 2.71; 13.5) for ketorolac use and of 5.24 (95% confidence interval 1.85; 14.8) for use of other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for anastomotic leakage during the first seven postoperative days.CONCLUSION: In the present study, we found a strong association between the postoperative use of ketorolac and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and the risk for anastomotic leakage after surgery for gastro-esophageal-junction cancers.

KW - Journal Article

U2 - 10.1007/s11605-017-3623-7

DO - 10.1007/s11605-017-3623-7

M3 - Journal article

VL - 22

SP - 587

EP - 594

JO - Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery

JF - Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery

SN - 1091-255X

IS - 4

ER -

ID: 52386796