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Interrater Reliability of the 6-Minute Walk Test in Women With Hip Fracture

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Overgaard, Jan Arnholtz ; Larsen, Camilla Marie ; Holtze, Steffen ; Ockholm, Kenneth ; Kristensen, Morten Tange. / Interrater Reliability of the 6-Minute Walk Test in Women With Hip Fracture. I: Journal of geriatric physical therapy. 2017 ; Bind 40, Nr. 3. s. 158-166.

Bibtex

@article{ca6bf5ba0bd24aed8d81c38f7ccfe111,
title = "Interrater Reliability of the 6-Minute Walk Test in Women With Hip Fracture",
abstract = "BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The 6-minute walk test (6MWT) is widely used as a clinical outcome measure. However, the reliability of the 6MWT is unknown in individuals who have recently experienced a hip fracture. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relative and absolute interrater reliability of the 6MWT in individuals with hip fracture.METHODS: Two senior physical therapy students independently examined a convenience sample of 20 participants in a randomized order. Their assessments were separated by 2 days and followed the guidelines of the American Thoracic Society. Hip fracture-related pain was assessed with the Verbal Ranking Scale.RESULTS: Participants (all women) with a mean (standard deviation) age of 78.1 (5.9) years performed the test at a mean of 31.5 (5.8) days postsurgery. Of the participants, 10 had a cervical fracture and 10 had a trochanteric fracture. Excellent interrater reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC2.1] = 0.92; 95% confidence interval, 0.81-0.97) was found, and the standard error of measurement and smallest real difference were calculated to be 21.4 and 59.4 m, respectively. Bland-Altman plots revealed no significant difference (mean of 3.2 [31.5] m, P = .83) between the 2 raters, and no heteroscedasticity was observed (r = -0.196, P = .41). By contrast, participants walked an average of 21.7 (22.5) m longer during the second trial (P = .002). Participants with moderate hip fracture-related pain walked a shorter distance than those with no or light pain during the first test (P = .04), but this was not the case during the second test (P = .25).CONCLUSION: The interrater reliability of the 6MWT is excellent, and changes of more than 21.4 m (group level) and 59.4 m (individual participants with hip fracture) indicate a real change in the 6MWT. Measuring hip fracture-related pain during testing is recommended for individuals with hip fracture who undergo the 6MWT.",
author = "Overgaard, {Jan Arnholtz} and Larsen, {Camilla Marie} and Steffen Holtze and Kenneth Ockholm and Kristensen, {Morten Tange}",
year = "2017",
month = jul,
doi = "10.1519/JPT.0000000000000088",
language = "English",
volume = "40",
pages = "158--166",
journal = "Journal of Geriatric Physical Therapy",
issn = "1539-8412",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams & Wilkins",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Interrater Reliability of the 6-Minute Walk Test in Women With Hip Fracture

AU - Overgaard, Jan Arnholtz

AU - Larsen, Camilla Marie

AU - Holtze, Steffen

AU - Ockholm, Kenneth

AU - Kristensen, Morten Tange

PY - 2017/7

Y1 - 2017/7

N2 - BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The 6-minute walk test (6MWT) is widely used as a clinical outcome measure. However, the reliability of the 6MWT is unknown in individuals who have recently experienced a hip fracture. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relative and absolute interrater reliability of the 6MWT in individuals with hip fracture.METHODS: Two senior physical therapy students independently examined a convenience sample of 20 participants in a randomized order. Their assessments were separated by 2 days and followed the guidelines of the American Thoracic Society. Hip fracture-related pain was assessed with the Verbal Ranking Scale.RESULTS: Participants (all women) with a mean (standard deviation) age of 78.1 (5.9) years performed the test at a mean of 31.5 (5.8) days postsurgery. Of the participants, 10 had a cervical fracture and 10 had a trochanteric fracture. Excellent interrater reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC2.1] = 0.92; 95% confidence interval, 0.81-0.97) was found, and the standard error of measurement and smallest real difference were calculated to be 21.4 and 59.4 m, respectively. Bland-Altman plots revealed no significant difference (mean of 3.2 [31.5] m, P = .83) between the 2 raters, and no heteroscedasticity was observed (r = -0.196, P = .41). By contrast, participants walked an average of 21.7 (22.5) m longer during the second trial (P = .002). Participants with moderate hip fracture-related pain walked a shorter distance than those with no or light pain during the first test (P = .04), but this was not the case during the second test (P = .25).CONCLUSION: The interrater reliability of the 6MWT is excellent, and changes of more than 21.4 m (group level) and 59.4 m (individual participants with hip fracture) indicate a real change in the 6MWT. Measuring hip fracture-related pain during testing is recommended for individuals with hip fracture who undergo the 6MWT.

AB - BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The 6-minute walk test (6MWT) is widely used as a clinical outcome measure. However, the reliability of the 6MWT is unknown in individuals who have recently experienced a hip fracture. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relative and absolute interrater reliability of the 6MWT in individuals with hip fracture.METHODS: Two senior physical therapy students independently examined a convenience sample of 20 participants in a randomized order. Their assessments were separated by 2 days and followed the guidelines of the American Thoracic Society. Hip fracture-related pain was assessed with the Verbal Ranking Scale.RESULTS: Participants (all women) with a mean (standard deviation) age of 78.1 (5.9) years performed the test at a mean of 31.5 (5.8) days postsurgery. Of the participants, 10 had a cervical fracture and 10 had a trochanteric fracture. Excellent interrater reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC2.1] = 0.92; 95% confidence interval, 0.81-0.97) was found, and the standard error of measurement and smallest real difference were calculated to be 21.4 and 59.4 m, respectively. Bland-Altman plots revealed no significant difference (mean of 3.2 [31.5] m, P = .83) between the 2 raters, and no heteroscedasticity was observed (r = -0.196, P = .41). By contrast, participants walked an average of 21.7 (22.5) m longer during the second trial (P = .002). Participants with moderate hip fracture-related pain walked a shorter distance than those with no or light pain during the first test (P = .04), but this was not the case during the second test (P = .25).CONCLUSION: The interrater reliability of the 6MWT is excellent, and changes of more than 21.4 m (group level) and 59.4 m (individual participants with hip fracture) indicate a real change in the 6MWT. Measuring hip fracture-related pain during testing is recommended for individuals with hip fracture who undergo the 6MWT.

U2 - 10.1519/JPT.0000000000000088

DO - 10.1519/JPT.0000000000000088

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 27213999

VL - 40

SP - 158

EP - 166

JO - Journal of Geriatric Physical Therapy

JF - Journal of Geriatric Physical Therapy

SN - 1539-8412

IS - 3

ER -

ID: 46460169