Forskning
Udskriv Udskriv
Switch language
Region Hovedstaden - en del af Københavns Universitetshospital
E-pub ahead of print

Intelligence test scores before and after alcohol-related disorders - a longitudinal study of Danish male conscripts

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Harvard

APA

CBE

MLA

Vancouver

Author

Bibtex

@article{fed41b13c8f248b68da10a47f7939ac8,
title = "Intelligence test scores before and after alcohol-related disorders - a longitudinal study of Danish male conscripts",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Existing studies on intellectual consequences of alcohol-related disorders are primarily cross-sectional and compare intelligence test scores of individuals with and without alcohol-related disorders; hence, mixing the influence of alcohol-related disorders and predisposing factors such as premorbid intelligence. In this large-scale study, the primary aim was to estimate associations of alcohol-related disorders with changes in intelligence test scores from early adulthood to late midlife.METHODS: Data were drawn from a follow-up study on middle-aged men which included a re-examination of the same intelligence test as completed in young adulthood at military conscription (total analytic sample=2,499). Alcohol-related hospital diagnoses were obtained from national health registries, whereas treatment for alcohol problems was self-reported at follow-up. The analyses included adjustment for year of birth, retest interval, baseline IQ score, education, smoking, alcohol consumption, and comorbidity.RESULTS: Individuals with alcohol-related hospital diagnoses (8{\%}) had a significantly lower baseline IQ score (95.0 vs. 100.5, p<0.001) and a larger decline in IQ scores from baseline to follow-up (-8.5 vs. -4.8, p<0.001) than individuals without such diagnoses. The larger decline in IQ scores with alcohol-related hospital diagnoses remained statistically significant after adjustment for all the covariates. Similar results were revealed when IQ scores before and after self-reported treatment for alcohol problems (10{\%}) were examined.CONCLUSIONS: Individuals with alcohol-related disorders have a lower intelligence test score both in young adulthood and late midlife and these disorders, moreover, seem to be associated with more age-related decline in intelligence test scores. Thus, low mean intellectual ability observed in individuals with alcohol-related disorders is probably a result of both lower premorbid intelligence and more intellectual decline. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.",
author = "Marie Gr{\o}nkjaer and Trine Flensborg-Madsen and Merete Osler and S{\o}rensen, {Holger Jelling} and Ulrik Becker and Mortensen, {Erik Lykke}",
note = "This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.",
year = "2019",
month = "8",
day = "6",
doi = "10.1111/acer.14174",
language = "English",
journal = "Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research",
issn = "0145-6008",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Intelligence test scores before and after alcohol-related disorders - a longitudinal study of Danish male conscripts

AU - Grønkjaer, Marie

AU - Flensborg-Madsen, Trine

AU - Osler, Merete

AU - Sørensen, Holger Jelling

AU - Becker, Ulrik

AU - Mortensen, Erik Lykke

N1 - This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

PY - 2019/8/6

Y1 - 2019/8/6

N2 - BACKGROUND: Existing studies on intellectual consequences of alcohol-related disorders are primarily cross-sectional and compare intelligence test scores of individuals with and without alcohol-related disorders; hence, mixing the influence of alcohol-related disorders and predisposing factors such as premorbid intelligence. In this large-scale study, the primary aim was to estimate associations of alcohol-related disorders with changes in intelligence test scores from early adulthood to late midlife.METHODS: Data were drawn from a follow-up study on middle-aged men which included a re-examination of the same intelligence test as completed in young adulthood at military conscription (total analytic sample=2,499). Alcohol-related hospital diagnoses were obtained from national health registries, whereas treatment for alcohol problems was self-reported at follow-up. The analyses included adjustment for year of birth, retest interval, baseline IQ score, education, smoking, alcohol consumption, and comorbidity.RESULTS: Individuals with alcohol-related hospital diagnoses (8%) had a significantly lower baseline IQ score (95.0 vs. 100.5, p<0.001) and a larger decline in IQ scores from baseline to follow-up (-8.5 vs. -4.8, p<0.001) than individuals without such diagnoses. The larger decline in IQ scores with alcohol-related hospital diagnoses remained statistically significant after adjustment for all the covariates. Similar results were revealed when IQ scores before and after self-reported treatment for alcohol problems (10%) were examined.CONCLUSIONS: Individuals with alcohol-related disorders have a lower intelligence test score both in young adulthood and late midlife and these disorders, moreover, seem to be associated with more age-related decline in intelligence test scores. Thus, low mean intellectual ability observed in individuals with alcohol-related disorders is probably a result of both lower premorbid intelligence and more intellectual decline. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

AB - BACKGROUND: Existing studies on intellectual consequences of alcohol-related disorders are primarily cross-sectional and compare intelligence test scores of individuals with and without alcohol-related disorders; hence, mixing the influence of alcohol-related disorders and predisposing factors such as premorbid intelligence. In this large-scale study, the primary aim was to estimate associations of alcohol-related disorders with changes in intelligence test scores from early adulthood to late midlife.METHODS: Data were drawn from a follow-up study on middle-aged men which included a re-examination of the same intelligence test as completed in young adulthood at military conscription (total analytic sample=2,499). Alcohol-related hospital diagnoses were obtained from national health registries, whereas treatment for alcohol problems was self-reported at follow-up. The analyses included adjustment for year of birth, retest interval, baseline IQ score, education, smoking, alcohol consumption, and comorbidity.RESULTS: Individuals with alcohol-related hospital diagnoses (8%) had a significantly lower baseline IQ score (95.0 vs. 100.5, p<0.001) and a larger decline in IQ scores from baseline to follow-up (-8.5 vs. -4.8, p<0.001) than individuals without such diagnoses. The larger decline in IQ scores with alcohol-related hospital diagnoses remained statistically significant after adjustment for all the covariates. Similar results were revealed when IQ scores before and after self-reported treatment for alcohol problems (10%) were examined.CONCLUSIONS: Individuals with alcohol-related disorders have a lower intelligence test score both in young adulthood and late midlife and these disorders, moreover, seem to be associated with more age-related decline in intelligence test scores. Thus, low mean intellectual ability observed in individuals with alcohol-related disorders is probably a result of both lower premorbid intelligence and more intellectual decline. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

U2 - 10.1111/acer.14174

DO - 10.1111/acer.14174

M3 - Journal article

JO - Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research

JF - Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research

SN - 0145-6008

ER -

ID: 57728140