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Insulin resistance genetic risk score and burden of coronary artery disease in patients referred for coronary angiography

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@article{3266ec4fef0c4e05ae90b2aee7f5ec48,
title = "Insulin resistance genetic risk score and burden of coronary artery disease in patients referred for coronary angiography",
abstract = "AIMS: Insulin resistance associates with development of metabolic syndrome and risk of cardiovascular disease. The link between insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease is complex and multifactorial. Confirming the genetic link between insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and coronary artery disease, as well as the extent of coronary artery disease, is important and may provide better risk stratification for patients at risk. We investigated whether a genetic risk score of 53 single nucleotide polymorphisms known to be associated with insulin resistance phenotypes was associated with diabetes and burden of coronary artery disease.METHODS AND RESULTS: We genotyped patients with a coronary angiography performed in the capital region of Denmark from 2010-2014 and constructed a genetic risk score of the 53 single nucleotide polymorphisms. Logistic regression using quartiles of the genetic risk score was performed to determine associations with diabetes and coronary artery disease. Associations with the extent of coronary artery disease, defined as one-, two- or three-vessel coronary artery disease, was determined by multinomial logistic regression. We identified 4,963 patients, of which 17% had diabetes and 55% had significant coronary artery disease. Of the latter, 27%, 14% and 14% had one, two or three-vessel coronary artery disease, respectively. No significant increased risk of diabetes was identified comparing the highest genetic risk score quartile with the lowest. An increased risk of coronary artery disease was found for patients with the highest genetic risk score quartile in both unadjusted and adjusted analyses, OR 1.21 (95% CI: 1.03, 1.42, p = 0.02) and 1.25 (95% CI 1.06, 1.48, p<0.01), respectively. In the adjusted multinomial logistic regression, patients in the highest genetic risk score quartile were more likely to develop three-vessel coronary artery disease compared with patients in the lowest genetic risk score quartile, OR 1.41 (95% CI: 1.10, 1.82, p<0.01).CONCLUSIONS: Among patients referred for coronary angiography, only a strong genetic predisposition to insulin resistance was associated with risk of coronary artery disease and with a greater disease burden.",
author = "Regitze Skals and Krogager, {Maria Luk{\'a}cs} and Appel, {Emil Vincent R} and Schnurr, {Theresia M} and Have, {Christian Theil} and Gunnar Gislason and Poulsen, {Henrik Enghusen} and Lars K{\o}ber and Thomas Engstr{\o}m and Steen Stender and Torben Hansen and Niels Grarup and Lee, {Christina Ji-Young} and Charlotte Andersson and Christian Torp-Pedersen and Weeke, {Peter E}",
year = "2021",
month = jun,
doi = "10.1371/journal.pone.0252855",
language = "English",
volume = "16",
pages = "e0252855",
journal = "PLOS ONE",
issn = "1932-6203",
publisher = "Public Library of Science",
number = "6",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Insulin resistance genetic risk score and burden of coronary artery disease in patients referred for coronary angiography

AU - Skals, Regitze

AU - Krogager, Maria Lukács

AU - Appel, Emil Vincent R

AU - Schnurr, Theresia M

AU - Have, Christian Theil

AU - Gislason, Gunnar

AU - Poulsen, Henrik Enghusen

AU - Køber, Lars

AU - Engstrøm, Thomas

AU - Stender, Steen

AU - Hansen, Torben

AU - Grarup, Niels

AU - Lee, Christina Ji-Young

AU - Andersson, Charlotte

AU - Torp-Pedersen, Christian

AU - Weeke, Peter E

PY - 2021/6

Y1 - 2021/6

N2 - AIMS: Insulin resistance associates with development of metabolic syndrome and risk of cardiovascular disease. The link between insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease is complex and multifactorial. Confirming the genetic link between insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and coronary artery disease, as well as the extent of coronary artery disease, is important and may provide better risk stratification for patients at risk. We investigated whether a genetic risk score of 53 single nucleotide polymorphisms known to be associated with insulin resistance phenotypes was associated with diabetes and burden of coronary artery disease.METHODS AND RESULTS: We genotyped patients with a coronary angiography performed in the capital region of Denmark from 2010-2014 and constructed a genetic risk score of the 53 single nucleotide polymorphisms. Logistic regression using quartiles of the genetic risk score was performed to determine associations with diabetes and coronary artery disease. Associations with the extent of coronary artery disease, defined as one-, two- or three-vessel coronary artery disease, was determined by multinomial logistic regression. We identified 4,963 patients, of which 17% had diabetes and 55% had significant coronary artery disease. Of the latter, 27%, 14% and 14% had one, two or three-vessel coronary artery disease, respectively. No significant increased risk of diabetes was identified comparing the highest genetic risk score quartile with the lowest. An increased risk of coronary artery disease was found for patients with the highest genetic risk score quartile in both unadjusted and adjusted analyses, OR 1.21 (95% CI: 1.03, 1.42, p = 0.02) and 1.25 (95% CI 1.06, 1.48, p<0.01), respectively. In the adjusted multinomial logistic regression, patients in the highest genetic risk score quartile were more likely to develop three-vessel coronary artery disease compared with patients in the lowest genetic risk score quartile, OR 1.41 (95% CI: 1.10, 1.82, p<0.01).CONCLUSIONS: Among patients referred for coronary angiography, only a strong genetic predisposition to insulin resistance was associated with risk of coronary artery disease and with a greater disease burden.

AB - AIMS: Insulin resistance associates with development of metabolic syndrome and risk of cardiovascular disease. The link between insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease is complex and multifactorial. Confirming the genetic link between insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and coronary artery disease, as well as the extent of coronary artery disease, is important and may provide better risk stratification for patients at risk. We investigated whether a genetic risk score of 53 single nucleotide polymorphisms known to be associated with insulin resistance phenotypes was associated with diabetes and burden of coronary artery disease.METHODS AND RESULTS: We genotyped patients with a coronary angiography performed in the capital region of Denmark from 2010-2014 and constructed a genetic risk score of the 53 single nucleotide polymorphisms. Logistic regression using quartiles of the genetic risk score was performed to determine associations with diabetes and coronary artery disease. Associations with the extent of coronary artery disease, defined as one-, two- or three-vessel coronary artery disease, was determined by multinomial logistic regression. We identified 4,963 patients, of which 17% had diabetes and 55% had significant coronary artery disease. Of the latter, 27%, 14% and 14% had one, two or three-vessel coronary artery disease, respectively. No significant increased risk of diabetes was identified comparing the highest genetic risk score quartile with the lowest. An increased risk of coronary artery disease was found for patients with the highest genetic risk score quartile in both unadjusted and adjusted analyses, OR 1.21 (95% CI: 1.03, 1.42, p = 0.02) and 1.25 (95% CI 1.06, 1.48, p<0.01), respectively. In the adjusted multinomial logistic regression, patients in the highest genetic risk score quartile were more likely to develop three-vessel coronary artery disease compared with patients in the lowest genetic risk score quartile, OR 1.41 (95% CI: 1.10, 1.82, p<0.01).CONCLUSIONS: Among patients referred for coronary angiography, only a strong genetic predisposition to insulin resistance was associated with risk of coronary artery disease and with a greater disease burden.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85108195644&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1371/journal.pone.0252855

DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0252855

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 34143812

VL - 16

SP - e0252855

JO - PLOS ONE

JF - PLOS ONE

SN - 1932-6203

IS - 6

M1 - e0252855

ER -

ID: 66834739