Forskning
Udskriv Udskriv
Switch language
Region Hovedstaden - en del af Københavns Universitetshospital
Udgivet

Insulin resistance and beta-cell function in different ethnic groups in Kenya: The role of abdominal fat distribution

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

DOI

  1. Attendance in a national screening program for diabetic retinopathy: a population-based study of 205,970 patients

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  2. Pregnancy outcomes in women with type 1 diabetes using insulin degludec

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  1. Feasibility of time-restricted eating in individuals with overweight or type 2 diabetes: a systematic scoping review

    Publikation: KonferencebidragKonferenceabstrakt til konferenceForskningpeer review

  2. Prevalence of biofilms in acute infections challenges a longstanding paradigm

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  3. Rapid syndromic PCR testing in patients with respiratory tract infections reduces time to results and improves microbial yield

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  4. Feasibility of time-restricted eating in individuals with overweight or type 2 diabetes: a systematic scoping review

    Publikation: KonferencebidragKonferenceabstrakt til konferenceForskningpeer review

Vis graf over relationer

Little is known about the pathophysiology of diabetes in Africans. Thus, we assessed whether insulin resistance and beta-cell function differed by ethnicity in Kenya and whether differences were modified by abdominal fat distribution. A cross-sectional study in 1,087 rural Luo (n = 361), Kamba (n = 378), and Maasai (n = 348) was conducted. All participants had a standard 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Venous blood samples were collected at 0, 30, and 120 min. Serum insulin was analysed at 0 and 30 min. From the OGTT, we assessed the homoeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance by computer model, early phase insulin secretion, and disposition index (DI) dividing insulin secretion by insulin resistance. Abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) thickness were carried out by ultrasonography. Linear regression analyses were done to assess ethnic differences in insulin indices. The Maasai had 32 and 17 % higher insulin resistance than the Luo and Kamba, respectively (p < 0.001). Early phase insulin secretion was 16 % higher in the Maasai compared to the Luo (p < 0.001). DI was 12 % (p = 0.002) and 10 % (p = 0.015) lower in the Maasai compared to the Luo and Kamba, respectively. Adjustments of SAT (range 0.1-7.1 cm) and VAT (range 1.5-14.2 cm) largely explained these inter-group differences with the Maasai having the highest combined abdominal fat accumulation. The Maasai had the highest insulin resistance and secretion, but the lowest relative beta-cell function compared to the Luo and Kamba. These differences were primarily explained by abdominal fat distribution.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftActa Diabetologica
Vol/bind51
Udgave nummer1
Sider (fra-til)53-60
Antal sider8
ISSN0940-5429
DOI
StatusUdgivet - feb. 2014
Eksternt udgivetJa

ID: 51559402