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Influence of visual feedback, hand dominance and sex on individuated finger movements

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  • Anna-Maria Johansson
  • Helena Grip
  • Louise Rönnqvist
  • Jonas Selling
  • Carl-Johan Boraxbekk
  • Andrew Strong
  • Charlotte K Häger
Vis graf over relationer

The ability to perform individual finger movements, highly important in daily activities, involves visual monitoring and proprioception. We investigated the influence of vision on the spatial and temporal control of independent finger movements, for the dominant and non-dominant hand and in relation to sex. Twenty-six healthy middle-aged to old adults (M age = 61 years; range 46-79 years; females n = 13) participated. Participants performed cyclic flexion-extension movements at the metacarpophalangeal joint of one finger at a time while keeping the other fingers as still as possible. Movements were recorded using 3D optoelectronic motion technique (120 Hz). The movement trajectory distance; speed peaks (movement smoothness); Individuation Index (II; the degree a finger can move in isolation from the other fingers) and Stationarity Index (SI; how still a finger remains while the other fingers move) were extracted. The main findings were: (1) vision only improved the II and SI marginally; (2) longer trajectories were evident in the no-vision condition for the fingers of the dominant hand in the female group; (3) longer trajectories were specifically evident for the middle and ring fingers within the female group; (4) females had marginally higher II and SI compared with males; and (5) females had fewer speed peaks than males, particularly for the ring finger. Our results suggest that visual monitoring of finger movements marginally improves performance of our non-manipulative finger movement task. A consistent finding was that females showed greater independent finger control compared with males.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftExperimental Brain Research
Vol/bind239
Udgave nummer6
Sider (fra-til)1911-1928
Antal sider18
ISSN0014-4819
DOI
StatusUdgivet - jun. 2021

Bibliografisk note

Funding Information:
Open access funding provided by Umea University. Anna-Maria Johansson was supported by a post-doc fellowship from the Promobilia Foundation (F14602), who also provided a project grant (Häger 17121); the Norrbacka-Eugenia foundation (820/17): the Foundation of stroke research in Norrland (Häger 2018); Region Västerbotten (Häger); The Swedish Stroke Association (Häger); and King Gustaf V and Queen Victoria’s Foundation of Freemasons (Häger 2019).

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