Forskning
Udskriv Udskriv
Switch language
Region Hovedstaden - en del af Københavns Universitetshospital
Udgivet

Influence of social factors on patient-reported late symptoms: Report from a controlled trial among long-term head and neck cancer survivors in Denmark

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

DOI

  1. Surgical consensus guidelines on sentinel node biopsy (SNB) in patients with oral cancer

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  2. The DAHANCA 32 study: Electrochemotherapy for recurrent mucosal head and neck cancer

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  3. Quality of life after thyroidectomy in patients with nontoxic nodular goiter: A prospective cohort study

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  4. Versatility of the facial artery myomucosal island flap in neopharyngeal reconstruction

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  1. Glioma risk associated with extent of estimated European genetic ancestry in African Americans and Hispanics

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  2. Psychological stress in long-term testicular cancer survivors: a Danish nationwide cohort study

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  3. A Weighted Genetic Risk Score of Adult Glioma Susceptibility Loci Associated with Pediatric Brain Tumor Risk

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Vis graf over relationer

BACKGROUND: The incidence of head and neck cancer and morbidity and mortality after treatment are associated with social factors. Whether social factors also play a role in the prevalence of late-onset symptoms after treatment for head and neck cancer is not clear.

METHODS: Three hundred sixty-nine survivors completed questionnaires on late symptoms and functioning.

RESULTS: Survivors with short education were more likely to report severe problems than those with medium or long education. In the fully adjusted model, the risk for problems with opening the mouth remained significantly increased (odds ratio [OR] = 3.20; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.18-8.63). For survivors who lived alone, the adjusted ORs were significantly increased for physical functioning (2.17; 95% CI = 1.01-4.68) and trouble with social eating (OR = 2.26; 95% CI = 1.14-4.47).

CONCLUSION: Self-reported severe late symptoms were more prevalent in survivors with short education and in those living alone, suggesting differences in perception of late symptoms between social groups. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck, 2015.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftHead and Neck
Vol/bind38
Udgave nummerSuppl. 1
Sider (fra-til)E1713-21
ISSN1043-3074
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2016

ID: 46187413