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Inflammatory bowel disease is associated with an increased risk of hospitalization for heart failure: a Danish Nationwide Cohort study

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@article{e4f6dfd3bba14c6488e99b94e29364fe,
title = "Inflammatory bowel disease is associated with an increased risk of hospitalization for heart failure: a Danish Nationwide Cohort study",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been linked to adverse cardiovascular events, but a relation to heart failure (HF) is uncertain. We investigated the IBD-associated risk of HF in a nationwide setting.METHODS AND RESULTS: A total of 5 436 647 Danish citizens, with no history of IBD or HF, were included on January 1, 1997, and followed up until first hospitalization for HF, death, or December 31, 2011. Of these subjects, 23 681 developed IBD for which disease activity was determined continuously throughout the study. The risk of hospitalization for HF was estimated with a Poisson regression model adjusting for comorbidity and cardiovascular pharmacotherapy as time-dependent covariates. During a mean follow-up of 11.8 years in the reference population and 6.4 years in the IBD group, hospitalization for HF occurred in 553 subjects with IBD and 171 405 in the reference population. Patients with IBD had a 37{\%} increased risk of hospitalization for HF (incidence rate ratio, 1.37; 95{\%} confidence interval, 1.26-1.49) compared with the reference population. IBD activity-specific analyses showed markedly increased risk of HF hospitalization during flares (incidence rate ratio, 2.54; 95{\%} confidence interval, 2.13-3.04) and persistent activity (incidence rate ratio, 2.73; 95{\%} confidence interval, 2.25-3.33) but not in IBD remission (incidence rate ratio, 1.04; 95{\%} confidence interval, 0.94-1.16).CONCLUSIONS: In a nationwide cohort, IBD was associated with an increased risk of hospitalization for HF, and this risk was strongly correlated to periods of active disease. The mechanisms underlying this finding warrant further studies.",
author = "Kristensen, {S{\o}ren Lund} and Ole Ahlehoff and Jesper Lindhardsen and Rune Erichsen and Morten Lamberts and Usman Khalid and Nielsen, {Ole Haagen} and Christian Torp-Pedersen and Gislason, {Gunnar Hilmar} and Hansen, {Peter Riis}",
note = "{\circledC} 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.",
year = "2014",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1161/CIRCHEARTFAILURE.114.001152",
language = "English",
volume = "7",
pages = "717--22",
journal = "Circulation. Heart failure",
issn = "1941-3289",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams & Wilkins",
number = "5",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Inflammatory bowel disease is associated with an increased risk of hospitalization for heart failure

T2 - a Danish Nationwide Cohort study

AU - Kristensen, Søren Lund

AU - Ahlehoff, Ole

AU - Lindhardsen, Jesper

AU - Erichsen, Rune

AU - Lamberts, Morten

AU - Khalid, Usman

AU - Nielsen, Ole Haagen

AU - Torp-Pedersen, Christian

AU - Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar

AU - Hansen, Peter Riis

N1 - © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

PY - 2014/9

Y1 - 2014/9

N2 - BACKGROUND: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been linked to adverse cardiovascular events, but a relation to heart failure (HF) is uncertain. We investigated the IBD-associated risk of HF in a nationwide setting.METHODS AND RESULTS: A total of 5 436 647 Danish citizens, with no history of IBD or HF, were included on January 1, 1997, and followed up until first hospitalization for HF, death, or December 31, 2011. Of these subjects, 23 681 developed IBD for which disease activity was determined continuously throughout the study. The risk of hospitalization for HF was estimated with a Poisson regression model adjusting for comorbidity and cardiovascular pharmacotherapy as time-dependent covariates. During a mean follow-up of 11.8 years in the reference population and 6.4 years in the IBD group, hospitalization for HF occurred in 553 subjects with IBD and 171 405 in the reference population. Patients with IBD had a 37% increased risk of hospitalization for HF (incidence rate ratio, 1.37; 95% confidence interval, 1.26-1.49) compared with the reference population. IBD activity-specific analyses showed markedly increased risk of HF hospitalization during flares (incidence rate ratio, 2.54; 95% confidence interval, 2.13-3.04) and persistent activity (incidence rate ratio, 2.73; 95% confidence interval, 2.25-3.33) but not in IBD remission (incidence rate ratio, 1.04; 95% confidence interval, 0.94-1.16).CONCLUSIONS: In a nationwide cohort, IBD was associated with an increased risk of hospitalization for HF, and this risk was strongly correlated to periods of active disease. The mechanisms underlying this finding warrant further studies.

AB - BACKGROUND: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been linked to adverse cardiovascular events, but a relation to heart failure (HF) is uncertain. We investigated the IBD-associated risk of HF in a nationwide setting.METHODS AND RESULTS: A total of 5 436 647 Danish citizens, with no history of IBD or HF, were included on January 1, 1997, and followed up until first hospitalization for HF, death, or December 31, 2011. Of these subjects, 23 681 developed IBD for which disease activity was determined continuously throughout the study. The risk of hospitalization for HF was estimated with a Poisson regression model adjusting for comorbidity and cardiovascular pharmacotherapy as time-dependent covariates. During a mean follow-up of 11.8 years in the reference population and 6.4 years in the IBD group, hospitalization for HF occurred in 553 subjects with IBD and 171 405 in the reference population. Patients with IBD had a 37% increased risk of hospitalization for HF (incidence rate ratio, 1.37; 95% confidence interval, 1.26-1.49) compared with the reference population. IBD activity-specific analyses showed markedly increased risk of HF hospitalization during flares (incidence rate ratio, 2.54; 95% confidence interval, 2.13-3.04) and persistent activity (incidence rate ratio, 2.73; 95% confidence interval, 2.25-3.33) but not in IBD remission (incidence rate ratio, 1.04; 95% confidence interval, 0.94-1.16).CONCLUSIONS: In a nationwide cohort, IBD was associated with an increased risk of hospitalization for HF, and this risk was strongly correlated to periods of active disease. The mechanisms underlying this finding warrant further studies.

U2 - 10.1161/CIRCHEARTFAILURE.114.001152

DO - 10.1161/CIRCHEARTFAILURE.114.001152

M3 - Journal article

VL - 7

SP - 717

EP - 722

JO - Circulation. Heart failure

JF - Circulation. Heart failure

SN - 1941-3289

IS - 5

ER -

ID: 44677593