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Inflammatory bowel disease increases the risk of Parkinson's disease: a Danish nationwide cohort study 1977-2014

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@article{951ee97b518e4318a051f2e5c2455707,
title = "Inflammatory bowel disease increases the risk of Parkinson's disease: a Danish nationwide cohort study 1977-2014",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: Intestinal inflammation has been suggested to play a role in development of Parkinson's disease (PD) and multiple system atrophy (MSA). To test the hypothesis that IBD is associated with risk of PD and MSA, we performed a nationwide population-based cohort study.DESIGN: The cohort consisted of all individuals diagnosed with IBD in Denmark during 1977-2014 (n=76 477) and non-IBD individuals from the general population, who were comparable in terms of gender, age and vital status (n=7 548 259). All cohort members were followed from IBD diagnosis/index date to occurrence of PD and MSA (according to the Danish National Patient Register).RESULTS: Patients with IBD had a 22{\%} increased risk of PD as compared with non-IBD individuals (HR=1.22; 95{\%} CI 1.09 to 1.35). The increased risk was present independently of age at IBD diagnosis, gender or length of follow-up. The overall incidence of MSA was low in our study, and the regression analysis suggested a tendency towards higher risk of developing MSA in patients with IBD as compared with non-IBD individuals (HR=1.41; 95{\%} CI 0.82 to 2.44). Estimates were similar for women and men. The increased risk of parkinsonism was significantly higher among patients with UC (HR=1.35; 95{\%} CI 1.20 to 1.52) and not significantly different among patients with Crohn's disease (HR=1.12; 95{\%} CI 0.89 to 1.40).CONCLUSIONS: This nationwide, unselected, cohort study shows a significant association between IBD and later occurrence of PD, which is consistent with recent basic scientific findings of a potential role of GI inflammation in development of parkinsonian disorders.",
keywords = "Adult, Aged, Denmark/epidemiology, Female, Humans, Incidence, Inflammatory Bowel Diseases/complications, Male, Middle Aged, Parkinson Disease/epidemiology, Risk",
author = "Marie Villumsen and Susana Aznar and Bente Pakkenberg and Tine Jess and Tomasz Brudek",
note = "{\circledC} Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2019. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1136/gutjnl-2017-315666",
language = "English",
volume = "68",
pages = "18--24",
journal = "Gut",
issn = "0017-5749",
publisher = "B M J Group",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Inflammatory bowel disease increases the risk of Parkinson's disease

T2 - a Danish nationwide cohort study 1977-2014

AU - Villumsen, Marie

AU - Aznar, Susana

AU - Pakkenberg, Bente

AU - Jess, Tine

AU - Brudek, Tomasz

N1 - © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2019. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

PY - 2019/1

Y1 - 2019/1

N2 - OBJECTIVE: Intestinal inflammation has been suggested to play a role in development of Parkinson's disease (PD) and multiple system atrophy (MSA). To test the hypothesis that IBD is associated with risk of PD and MSA, we performed a nationwide population-based cohort study.DESIGN: The cohort consisted of all individuals diagnosed with IBD in Denmark during 1977-2014 (n=76 477) and non-IBD individuals from the general population, who were comparable in terms of gender, age and vital status (n=7 548 259). All cohort members were followed from IBD diagnosis/index date to occurrence of PD and MSA (according to the Danish National Patient Register).RESULTS: Patients with IBD had a 22% increased risk of PD as compared with non-IBD individuals (HR=1.22; 95% CI 1.09 to 1.35). The increased risk was present independently of age at IBD diagnosis, gender or length of follow-up. The overall incidence of MSA was low in our study, and the regression analysis suggested a tendency towards higher risk of developing MSA in patients with IBD as compared with non-IBD individuals (HR=1.41; 95% CI 0.82 to 2.44). Estimates were similar for women and men. The increased risk of parkinsonism was significantly higher among patients with UC (HR=1.35; 95% CI 1.20 to 1.52) and not significantly different among patients with Crohn's disease (HR=1.12; 95% CI 0.89 to 1.40).CONCLUSIONS: This nationwide, unselected, cohort study shows a significant association between IBD and later occurrence of PD, which is consistent with recent basic scientific findings of a potential role of GI inflammation in development of parkinsonian disorders.

AB - OBJECTIVE: Intestinal inflammation has been suggested to play a role in development of Parkinson's disease (PD) and multiple system atrophy (MSA). To test the hypothesis that IBD is associated with risk of PD and MSA, we performed a nationwide population-based cohort study.DESIGN: The cohort consisted of all individuals diagnosed with IBD in Denmark during 1977-2014 (n=76 477) and non-IBD individuals from the general population, who were comparable in terms of gender, age and vital status (n=7 548 259). All cohort members were followed from IBD diagnosis/index date to occurrence of PD and MSA (according to the Danish National Patient Register).RESULTS: Patients with IBD had a 22% increased risk of PD as compared with non-IBD individuals (HR=1.22; 95% CI 1.09 to 1.35). The increased risk was present independently of age at IBD diagnosis, gender or length of follow-up. The overall incidence of MSA was low in our study, and the regression analysis suggested a tendency towards higher risk of developing MSA in patients with IBD as compared with non-IBD individuals (HR=1.41; 95% CI 0.82 to 2.44). Estimates were similar for women and men. The increased risk of parkinsonism was significantly higher among patients with UC (HR=1.35; 95% CI 1.20 to 1.52) and not significantly different among patients with Crohn's disease (HR=1.12; 95% CI 0.89 to 1.40).CONCLUSIONS: This nationwide, unselected, cohort study shows a significant association between IBD and later occurrence of PD, which is consistent with recent basic scientific findings of a potential role of GI inflammation in development of parkinsonian disorders.

KW - Adult

KW - Aged

KW - Denmark/epidemiology

KW - Female

KW - Humans

KW - Incidence

KW - Inflammatory Bowel Diseases/complications

KW - Male

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Parkinson Disease/epidemiology

KW - Risk

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85047984367&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1136/gutjnl-2017-315666

DO - 10.1136/gutjnl-2017-315666

M3 - Journal article

VL - 68

SP - 18

EP - 24

JO - Gut

JF - Gut

SN - 0017-5749

IS - 1

ER -

ID: 54442451