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Incidence of atrial fibrillation in conjunction with breast cancer

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@article{2b87227c5deb4318953e7acf8171470f,
title = "Incidence of atrial fibrillation in conjunction with breast cancer",
abstract = "Background: Patients with breast cancer may have an increased incidence of atrial fibrillation (AF) because of the systemic inflammation induced by the cancer and side effects of treatments. Objective: The purpose of this study was to estimate the long-term incidence of AF in patients with breast cancer compared with the background population. Methods: We identified patients diagnosed with breast cancer from 1998 to 2015 by using nationwide registries. Female patients with breast cancer were matched (1:3) by age and sex with the background population. The long-term incidence of AF was estimated by cumulative incidence curves and multivariable Cox regression models. Results: We matched 74,155 patients with breast cancer with 222,465 patients from the background population. Breast cancer was associated with incident AF and the association differed between age groups (interaction analysis, P <.0001) and follow-up time periods. In patients younger than 60 years breast cancer was associated with increased incidence of AF during the first 6 months (hazard ratio [HR] 2.10; 95{\%} confidence interval [CI] 1.25–3.44) and from 6 months to 3 years (HR 1.80; 95{\%} CI 1.38–2.35). In patients older than 60 years, breast cancer was not associated with increased incidence of AF during the first 6 months (HR 1.13; 95{\%} CI 0.95–1.34) and was associated with increased incidence of AF from 6 months to 3 years (HR 1.14; 95{\%} CI 1.05–1.25). Conclusion: The long-term incidence of AF was increased in patients with breast cancer and short-term incidence was increased in patients younger than 60 years and similar in patients older than 60 years compared with the background population.",
keywords = "Age, Atrial fibrillation, Breast cancer, Cohort study, Nationwide, Risk factors, Women",
author = "Maria D'Souza and L{\ae}rke Smedegaard and Christian Madelaire and Dorte Nielsen and Christian Torp-Pedersen and Gunnar Gislason and Morten Schou and Emil Fosb{\o}l",
note = "Copyright {\circledC} 2018 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.",
year = "2019",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.hrthm.2018.10.017",
language = "English",
volume = "16",
pages = "343--348",
journal = "Heart Rhythm",
issn = "1547-5271",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Incidence of atrial fibrillation in conjunction with breast cancer

AU - D'Souza, Maria

AU - Smedegaard, Lærke

AU - Madelaire, Christian

AU - Nielsen, Dorte

AU - Torp-Pedersen, Christian

AU - Gislason, Gunnar

AU - Schou, Morten

AU - Fosbøl, Emil

N1 - Copyright © 2018 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PY - 2019/3/1

Y1 - 2019/3/1

N2 - Background: Patients with breast cancer may have an increased incidence of atrial fibrillation (AF) because of the systemic inflammation induced by the cancer and side effects of treatments. Objective: The purpose of this study was to estimate the long-term incidence of AF in patients with breast cancer compared with the background population. Methods: We identified patients diagnosed with breast cancer from 1998 to 2015 by using nationwide registries. Female patients with breast cancer were matched (1:3) by age and sex with the background population. The long-term incidence of AF was estimated by cumulative incidence curves and multivariable Cox regression models. Results: We matched 74,155 patients with breast cancer with 222,465 patients from the background population. Breast cancer was associated with incident AF and the association differed between age groups (interaction analysis, P <.0001) and follow-up time periods. In patients younger than 60 years breast cancer was associated with increased incidence of AF during the first 6 months (hazard ratio [HR] 2.10; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.25–3.44) and from 6 months to 3 years (HR 1.80; 95% CI 1.38–2.35). In patients older than 60 years, breast cancer was not associated with increased incidence of AF during the first 6 months (HR 1.13; 95% CI 0.95–1.34) and was associated with increased incidence of AF from 6 months to 3 years (HR 1.14; 95% CI 1.05–1.25). Conclusion: The long-term incidence of AF was increased in patients with breast cancer and short-term incidence was increased in patients younger than 60 years and similar in patients older than 60 years compared with the background population.

AB - Background: Patients with breast cancer may have an increased incidence of atrial fibrillation (AF) because of the systemic inflammation induced by the cancer and side effects of treatments. Objective: The purpose of this study was to estimate the long-term incidence of AF in patients with breast cancer compared with the background population. Methods: We identified patients diagnosed with breast cancer from 1998 to 2015 by using nationwide registries. Female patients with breast cancer were matched (1:3) by age and sex with the background population. The long-term incidence of AF was estimated by cumulative incidence curves and multivariable Cox regression models. Results: We matched 74,155 patients with breast cancer with 222,465 patients from the background population. Breast cancer was associated with incident AF and the association differed between age groups (interaction analysis, P <.0001) and follow-up time periods. In patients younger than 60 years breast cancer was associated with increased incidence of AF during the first 6 months (hazard ratio [HR] 2.10; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.25–3.44) and from 6 months to 3 years (HR 1.80; 95% CI 1.38–2.35). In patients older than 60 years, breast cancer was not associated with increased incidence of AF during the first 6 months (HR 1.13; 95% CI 0.95–1.34) and was associated with increased incidence of AF from 6 months to 3 years (HR 1.14; 95% CI 1.05–1.25). Conclusion: The long-term incidence of AF was increased in patients with breast cancer and short-term incidence was increased in patients younger than 60 years and similar in patients older than 60 years compared with the background population.

KW - Age

KW - Atrial fibrillation

KW - Breast cancer

KW - Cohort study

KW - Nationwide

KW - Risk factors

KW - Women

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85059345718&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.hrthm.2018.10.017

DO - 10.1016/j.hrthm.2018.10.017

M3 - Journal article

VL - 16

SP - 343

EP - 348

JO - Heart Rhythm

JF - Heart Rhythm

SN - 1547-5271

IS - 3

ER -

ID: 57015736