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Incentives for Danish healthcare management based on a pilot outcome-based, patient-centric management model in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis: the non-interventional IMPROVE study

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@article{12b51374c8e943c897b3ba3533554994,
title = "Incentives for Danish healthcare management based on a pilot outcome-based, patient-centric management model in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis: the non-interventional IMPROVE study",
abstract = "Background: Psoriasis (PsO) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) are chronic diseases that affect patients' quality of life. The purpose of the present study was to develop a pilot outcome-based, patient-centric management model for PsO and PsA.Methods: The non-interventional IMPROVE (Incentives for healthcare management based on patient-related outcomes and value) study being conducted in Denmark consists of 5 phases: 1) collecting real-world evidence to estimate treatment patterns and disease burden to the healthcare sector and patients; 2) identifying disease aspects which matter most to patients by use of concept mapping; 3) conducting interviews with healthcare professionals and patient organization involved in a typical PsO or PsA patient journey in order to determine relevant measures to quantify patient-identified outcomes; 4) developing a value-based remuneration model based on outcomes from phases 1-3; and 5) testing the outcome-based model in pre-selected hospitals in Denmark.Results: Both PsO and PsA are associated with multiple co-morbidities, increased healthcare costs, and loss of earnings. Seven important 'clusters' of disease aspects were identified for both PsO and PsA, including uncertainty about disease progression and treatments, as well as inter-personal relations with healthcare providers. Hospital-based treatment was associated with high treatment costs. Although the outcome-based model could result in strategic behavior by doctors, those involved in defining the best outcome goals consider it unlikely.Conclusion: The new patient-centric outcome-based management model is expected to support optimal treatment and secure best possible outcomes for patients suffering from PsO or PsA. The practical implication of the present study are that the models developed are expected to increase focus on patient-centered healthcare, and help eliminate some of the inappropriate incentives that exist in activity-based remuneration systems.Trial registration: Not applicable; data collected from patient registries in Denmark.",
keywords = "Patient-centered healthcare, Psoriasis, Psoriatic arthritis, Value-based care",
author = "Thomsen, {Simon Francis} and Lone Skov and Kristensen, {Lars Erik} and Hedegaard, {Morten St{\o}rling} and Jakob Kjellberg and J{\o}rgensen, {Tanja Schj{\o}dt} and S{\o}ren Bren{\o}e and Rikke Dodge",
note = "{\textcopyright} The Author(s) 2020.",
year = "2020",
month = oct,
day = "12",
doi = "10.1186/s13690-020-00479-y",
language = "English",
volume = "78",
pages = "95",
journal = "Archives of Public Health",
issn = "0778-7367",
publisher = "Institut Scientifique de Sante Publique",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Incentives for Danish healthcare management based on a pilot outcome-based, patient-centric management model in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis

T2 - the non-interventional IMPROVE study

AU - Thomsen, Simon Francis

AU - Skov, Lone

AU - Kristensen, Lars Erik

AU - Hedegaard, Morten Størling

AU - Kjellberg, Jakob

AU - Jørgensen, Tanja Schjødt

AU - Brenøe, Søren

AU - Dodge, Rikke

N1 - © The Author(s) 2020.

PY - 2020/10/12

Y1 - 2020/10/12

N2 - Background: Psoriasis (PsO) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) are chronic diseases that affect patients' quality of life. The purpose of the present study was to develop a pilot outcome-based, patient-centric management model for PsO and PsA.Methods: The non-interventional IMPROVE (Incentives for healthcare management based on patient-related outcomes and value) study being conducted in Denmark consists of 5 phases: 1) collecting real-world evidence to estimate treatment patterns and disease burden to the healthcare sector and patients; 2) identifying disease aspects which matter most to patients by use of concept mapping; 3) conducting interviews with healthcare professionals and patient organization involved in a typical PsO or PsA patient journey in order to determine relevant measures to quantify patient-identified outcomes; 4) developing a value-based remuneration model based on outcomes from phases 1-3; and 5) testing the outcome-based model in pre-selected hospitals in Denmark.Results: Both PsO and PsA are associated with multiple co-morbidities, increased healthcare costs, and loss of earnings. Seven important 'clusters' of disease aspects were identified for both PsO and PsA, including uncertainty about disease progression and treatments, as well as inter-personal relations with healthcare providers. Hospital-based treatment was associated with high treatment costs. Although the outcome-based model could result in strategic behavior by doctors, those involved in defining the best outcome goals consider it unlikely.Conclusion: The new patient-centric outcome-based management model is expected to support optimal treatment and secure best possible outcomes for patients suffering from PsO or PsA. The practical implication of the present study are that the models developed are expected to increase focus on patient-centered healthcare, and help eliminate some of the inappropriate incentives that exist in activity-based remuneration systems.Trial registration: Not applicable; data collected from patient registries in Denmark.

AB - Background: Psoriasis (PsO) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) are chronic diseases that affect patients' quality of life. The purpose of the present study was to develop a pilot outcome-based, patient-centric management model for PsO and PsA.Methods: The non-interventional IMPROVE (Incentives for healthcare management based on patient-related outcomes and value) study being conducted in Denmark consists of 5 phases: 1) collecting real-world evidence to estimate treatment patterns and disease burden to the healthcare sector and patients; 2) identifying disease aspects which matter most to patients by use of concept mapping; 3) conducting interviews with healthcare professionals and patient organization involved in a typical PsO or PsA patient journey in order to determine relevant measures to quantify patient-identified outcomes; 4) developing a value-based remuneration model based on outcomes from phases 1-3; and 5) testing the outcome-based model in pre-selected hospitals in Denmark.Results: Both PsO and PsA are associated with multiple co-morbidities, increased healthcare costs, and loss of earnings. Seven important 'clusters' of disease aspects were identified for both PsO and PsA, including uncertainty about disease progression and treatments, as well as inter-personal relations with healthcare providers. Hospital-based treatment was associated with high treatment costs. Although the outcome-based model could result in strategic behavior by doctors, those involved in defining the best outcome goals consider it unlikely.Conclusion: The new patient-centric outcome-based management model is expected to support optimal treatment and secure best possible outcomes for patients suffering from PsO or PsA. The practical implication of the present study are that the models developed are expected to increase focus on patient-centered healthcare, and help eliminate some of the inappropriate incentives that exist in activity-based remuneration systems.Trial registration: Not applicable; data collected from patient registries in Denmark.

KW - Patient-centered healthcare

KW - Psoriasis

KW - Psoriatic arthritis

KW - Value-based care

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85092575085&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1186/s13690-020-00479-y

DO - 10.1186/s13690-020-00479-y

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 33062265

VL - 78

SP - 95

JO - Archives of Public Health

JF - Archives of Public Health

SN - 0778-7367

IS - 1

M1 - 95

ER -

ID: 61192604