Forskning
Udskriv Udskriv
Switch language
Region Hovedstaden - en del af Københavns Universitetshospital
Udgivet

Impact of delay in diagnosis and treatment-initiation on disease stage and survival in oral cavity cancer: a systematic review

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftReviewForskningpeer review

Harvard

APA

CBE

MLA

Vancouver

Author

Bibtex

@article{21ce5a6cc75a42be80300cf5b5531be0,
title = "Impact of delay in diagnosis and treatment-initiation on disease stage and survival in oral cavity cancer: a systematic review",
abstract = "AIM/OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to systematically review the literature on the impact of delay in diagnosis and treatment of oral cavity cancer.METHODS: PubMed and Embase were systematically searched for articles reporting impact of delay in diagnosis and treatment on cancer-stage and survival of oral cavity cancer. Studies comprising at least ten patients, and published since the year 2000, were included.RESULTS: Sixteen studies (n = 45,001, range: 62-18,677 per study, 83% men), from Australia, Asia, Europe, North America and South America, met the inclusion criteria. Eleven studies (n = 1,460) examined delay in diagnosis, while five studies (n = 43,541) reported delay in treatment. Eight of the eleven studies, examining delay in diagnosis (n = 1,220), analyzed the correlation between delay in diagnosis and tumor stage at diagnosis. Three studies found a significant correlation between patient delay and advanced stage at diagnosis (p < 0.05), whereas three other studies did not. The studies reporting a significant correlation were from Asian countries, whereas the three studies that did not find a correlation were from other continents. Studies reporting on professional delay and total diagnostic delay, generally, did not find a significant correlation with advanced cancer at diagnosis. Time to treatment (TTI), defined as time from diagnosis to treatment, was found significantly correlated with survival in three studies (p < 0.01, p < 0.001, p < 0.05), and nonsignificant in two studies.CONCLUSION: A significant correlation between patient delay and advanced stage cancer was reported in Asian studies only, while professional delay and total diagnostic delay were generally found to be non-correlated with advanced stage cancer at diagnosis. TTI was in some studies reported to be correlated with poorer outcome, while other studies did not report a correlation. One study presented that there was no clear advantage in overall survival (OS) for patients treated within 30 days, compared to patients treated between 30 and 44 days.",
keywords = "Delayed Diagnosis, Female, Humans, Male, Mouth Neoplasms/diagnosis, Neoplasm Staging, Time-to-Treatment",
author = "Lauritzen, {Benedicte Bitsch} and Jensen, {Jakob Schmidt} and Christian Gr{\o}nh{\o}j and Irene Wessel and {von Buchwald}, Christian",
year = "2021",
month = sep,
doi = "10.1080/0284186X.2021.1931712",
language = "English",
volume = "60",
pages = "1083--1090",
journal = "Acta Oncologica",
issn = "0284-186X",
publisher = "Informa Healthcare",
number = "9",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Impact of delay in diagnosis and treatment-initiation on disease stage and survival in oral cavity cancer

T2 - a systematic review

AU - Lauritzen, Benedicte Bitsch

AU - Jensen, Jakob Schmidt

AU - Grønhøj, Christian

AU - Wessel, Irene

AU - von Buchwald, Christian

PY - 2021/9

Y1 - 2021/9

N2 - AIM/OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to systematically review the literature on the impact of delay in diagnosis and treatment of oral cavity cancer.METHODS: PubMed and Embase were systematically searched for articles reporting impact of delay in diagnosis and treatment on cancer-stage and survival of oral cavity cancer. Studies comprising at least ten patients, and published since the year 2000, were included.RESULTS: Sixteen studies (n = 45,001, range: 62-18,677 per study, 83% men), from Australia, Asia, Europe, North America and South America, met the inclusion criteria. Eleven studies (n = 1,460) examined delay in diagnosis, while five studies (n = 43,541) reported delay in treatment. Eight of the eleven studies, examining delay in diagnosis (n = 1,220), analyzed the correlation between delay in diagnosis and tumor stage at diagnosis. Three studies found a significant correlation between patient delay and advanced stage at diagnosis (p < 0.05), whereas three other studies did not. The studies reporting a significant correlation were from Asian countries, whereas the three studies that did not find a correlation were from other continents. Studies reporting on professional delay and total diagnostic delay, generally, did not find a significant correlation with advanced cancer at diagnosis. Time to treatment (TTI), defined as time from diagnosis to treatment, was found significantly correlated with survival in three studies (p < 0.01, p < 0.001, p < 0.05), and nonsignificant in two studies.CONCLUSION: A significant correlation between patient delay and advanced stage cancer was reported in Asian studies only, while professional delay and total diagnostic delay were generally found to be non-correlated with advanced stage cancer at diagnosis. TTI was in some studies reported to be correlated with poorer outcome, while other studies did not report a correlation. One study presented that there was no clear advantage in overall survival (OS) for patients treated within 30 days, compared to patients treated between 30 and 44 days.

AB - AIM/OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to systematically review the literature on the impact of delay in diagnosis and treatment of oral cavity cancer.METHODS: PubMed and Embase were systematically searched for articles reporting impact of delay in diagnosis and treatment on cancer-stage and survival of oral cavity cancer. Studies comprising at least ten patients, and published since the year 2000, were included.RESULTS: Sixteen studies (n = 45,001, range: 62-18,677 per study, 83% men), from Australia, Asia, Europe, North America and South America, met the inclusion criteria. Eleven studies (n = 1,460) examined delay in diagnosis, while five studies (n = 43,541) reported delay in treatment. Eight of the eleven studies, examining delay in diagnosis (n = 1,220), analyzed the correlation between delay in diagnosis and tumor stage at diagnosis. Three studies found a significant correlation between patient delay and advanced stage at diagnosis (p < 0.05), whereas three other studies did not. The studies reporting a significant correlation were from Asian countries, whereas the three studies that did not find a correlation were from other continents. Studies reporting on professional delay and total diagnostic delay, generally, did not find a significant correlation with advanced cancer at diagnosis. Time to treatment (TTI), defined as time from diagnosis to treatment, was found significantly correlated with survival in three studies (p < 0.01, p < 0.001, p < 0.05), and nonsignificant in two studies.CONCLUSION: A significant correlation between patient delay and advanced stage cancer was reported in Asian studies only, while professional delay and total diagnostic delay were generally found to be non-correlated with advanced stage cancer at diagnosis. TTI was in some studies reported to be correlated with poorer outcome, while other studies did not report a correlation. One study presented that there was no clear advantage in overall survival (OS) for patients treated within 30 days, compared to patients treated between 30 and 44 days.

KW - Delayed Diagnosis

KW - Female

KW - Humans

KW - Male

KW - Mouth Neoplasms/diagnosis

KW - Neoplasm Staging

KW - Time-to-Treatment

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85106697315&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/0284186X.2021.1931712

DO - 10.1080/0284186X.2021.1931712

M3 - Review

C2 - 34043480

VL - 60

SP - 1083

EP - 1090

JO - Acta Oncologica

JF - Acta Oncologica

SN - 0284-186X

IS - 9

ER -

ID: 67742125