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Region Hovedstaden - en del af Københavns Universitetshospital
E-pub ahead of print

Impact of a manager-oriented intervention on occupational exposures and well-being among pregnant hospital and day-care employees: A cluster randomised trial

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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BACKGROUND: Pregnancy can make it difficult to cope with demands at work and may affect women's well-being. We investigated if a manager-targeted educational intervention reduced demanding occupational exposures and improved the psychosocial work environment and well-being among pregnant employees.

METHODS: Data came from a cluster randomised trial in Danish hospitals and day-care institutions. Work units were assigned randomly and were non-blinded to the intervention, where managers were either invited to participate in a three-hour seminar addressing job adjustment in pregnancy or assigned to a control group undertaking their usual practice. Self-reported outcomes by pregnant employees at the work units were the proportion of pregnant employees with demanding occupational exposures, good psychosocial work environment and good well-being. Mixed logistic regression was applied in the population of responders and in intention-to-treat analyses using multiple imputations.

RESULTS: We included 915 pregnant employees: 451 in the intervention group and 464 in the control group. Of 216 invited managers, 103 (48%) participated in the seminar. A total of 339 (37%) pregnant employees answered the questionnaire. The proportion of pregnant employees who had demanding occupational exposures, good psychosocial work environment and good well-being in the intervention versus the control group were 36% versus 39% (odds ratio (OR)=0.90, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.57-1.44), 56% versus 59% (OR=1.01, 95% CI 0.60-1.71) and 77% versus 73% (OR=1.13, 95% CI 0.68-1.87), respectively.

CONCLUSIONS: This manager-targeted educational intervention did not reduce demanding occupational exposures and did not improve the psychosocial work environment or the well-being among pregnant employees in hospital and day-care settings. Comprehensive and participatory interventions may be considered in future studies.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
BogserieScandinavian Journal of Public Health. Supplement
Sider (fra-til)14034948211018387
ISSN1403-4956
DOI
StatusE-pub ahead of print - 14 jun. 2021

ID: 66364066