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Immunity to vaccine-preventable diseases among paediatric healthcare workers in Denmark, 2019

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@article{3046809c1d3f463caf195b6c8273a149,
title = "Immunity to vaccine-preventable diseases among paediatric healthcare workers in Denmark, 2019",
abstract = "BackgroundHealthcare workers (HCW) have been identified as index cases in disease outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases (VPD) in hospitals.AimWe investigated whether Danish paediatric HCW were protected against selected serious VPD.MethodsWe included 90% of staff members from two paediatric departments. All 555 HCW (496 women) supplied a blood sample for serology and filled in a questionnaire. Antibodies were measured with enzyme immunoassay against measles, mumps, rubella (MMR), varicella zoster, pertussis toxin and diphtheria toxin.ResultsProtective levels of IgG were found for measles (90.3%), mumps (86.5%), rubella (92.3%), varicella (98.6%) and diphtheria (80.5%). We found seropositivity for all three MMR components in 421 (75.9%) HCW, lowest in those younger than 36 years (63.3%). Only 28 (5%) HCW had measurable IgG to pertussis. HCW with self-reported immunity defined as previous infection or vaccination, had protective levels of IgG against measles, mumps, rubella and varicella in 87.4-98.8% of cases, not significantly higher than in those not reporting immunity. Previous history of disease had a high positive predictive value (PPV) of 96.8-98.8%. The PPV for previous vaccination ranged from 82.5% to 90.3%. In contrast, negative predictive values of self-reported history of disease and vaccination were remarkably low for all diseases.ConclusionThe immunity gaps found primarily in young HCW indicate a need for a screening and vaccination strategy for this group. Considering the poor correlation between self-reported immunity and seropositivity, efforts should be made to check HCW's immune status in order to identify those who would benefit from vaccination.",
author = "{von Linstow}, Marie-Louise and {Yde Nielsen}, Alex and Nikolai Kirkby and Anna Eltvedt and {Nordmann Winther}, Thilde and {Bybeck Nielsen}, Allan and Didi Bang and Anja Poulsen",
note = "Publisher Copyright: {\textcopyright} 2021 European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC). All rights reserved. Copyright: Copyright 2021 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.",
year = "2021",
month = apr,
doi = "10.2807/1560-7917.ES.2021.26.17.2001167",
language = "English",
volume = "26",
pages = "1--9",
journal = "Eurosurveillance",
issn = "1560-7917",
publisher = "Centre Europeen pour la Surveillance Epidemiologique du SIDA",
number = "17",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Immunity to vaccine-preventable diseases among paediatric healthcare workers in Denmark, 2019

AU - von Linstow, Marie-Louise

AU - Yde Nielsen, Alex

AU - Kirkby, Nikolai

AU - Eltvedt, Anna

AU - Nordmann Winther, Thilde

AU - Bybeck Nielsen, Allan

AU - Bang, Didi

AU - Poulsen, Anja

N1 - Publisher Copyright: © 2021 European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC). All rights reserved. Copyright: Copyright 2021 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

PY - 2021/4

Y1 - 2021/4

N2 - BackgroundHealthcare workers (HCW) have been identified as index cases in disease outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases (VPD) in hospitals.AimWe investigated whether Danish paediatric HCW were protected against selected serious VPD.MethodsWe included 90% of staff members from two paediatric departments. All 555 HCW (496 women) supplied a blood sample for serology and filled in a questionnaire. Antibodies were measured with enzyme immunoassay against measles, mumps, rubella (MMR), varicella zoster, pertussis toxin and diphtheria toxin.ResultsProtective levels of IgG were found for measles (90.3%), mumps (86.5%), rubella (92.3%), varicella (98.6%) and diphtheria (80.5%). We found seropositivity for all three MMR components in 421 (75.9%) HCW, lowest in those younger than 36 years (63.3%). Only 28 (5%) HCW had measurable IgG to pertussis. HCW with self-reported immunity defined as previous infection or vaccination, had protective levels of IgG against measles, mumps, rubella and varicella in 87.4-98.8% of cases, not significantly higher than in those not reporting immunity. Previous history of disease had a high positive predictive value (PPV) of 96.8-98.8%. The PPV for previous vaccination ranged from 82.5% to 90.3%. In contrast, negative predictive values of self-reported history of disease and vaccination were remarkably low for all diseases.ConclusionThe immunity gaps found primarily in young HCW indicate a need for a screening and vaccination strategy for this group. Considering the poor correlation between self-reported immunity and seropositivity, efforts should be made to check HCW's immune status in order to identify those who would benefit from vaccination.

AB - BackgroundHealthcare workers (HCW) have been identified as index cases in disease outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases (VPD) in hospitals.AimWe investigated whether Danish paediatric HCW were protected against selected serious VPD.MethodsWe included 90% of staff members from two paediatric departments. All 555 HCW (496 women) supplied a blood sample for serology and filled in a questionnaire. Antibodies were measured with enzyme immunoassay against measles, mumps, rubella (MMR), varicella zoster, pertussis toxin and diphtheria toxin.ResultsProtective levels of IgG were found for measles (90.3%), mumps (86.5%), rubella (92.3%), varicella (98.6%) and diphtheria (80.5%). We found seropositivity for all three MMR components in 421 (75.9%) HCW, lowest in those younger than 36 years (63.3%). Only 28 (5%) HCW had measurable IgG to pertussis. HCW with self-reported immunity defined as previous infection or vaccination, had protective levels of IgG against measles, mumps, rubella and varicella in 87.4-98.8% of cases, not significantly higher than in those not reporting immunity. Previous history of disease had a high positive predictive value (PPV) of 96.8-98.8%. The PPV for previous vaccination ranged from 82.5% to 90.3%. In contrast, negative predictive values of self-reported history of disease and vaccination were remarkably low for all diseases.ConclusionThe immunity gaps found primarily in young HCW indicate a need for a screening and vaccination strategy for this group. Considering the poor correlation between self-reported immunity and seropositivity, efforts should be made to check HCW's immune status in order to identify those who would benefit from vaccination.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85105099126&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.2807/1560-7917.ES.2021.26.17.2001167

DO - 10.2807/1560-7917.ES.2021.26.17.2001167

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 33928900

VL - 26

SP - 1

EP - 9

JO - Eurosurveillance

JF - Eurosurveillance

SN - 1560-7917

IS - 17

ER -

ID: 65428732