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Identifying curriculum content for a cross-specialty robotic-assisted surgery training program: a Delphi study

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Hertz, Peter ; Houlind, Kim ; Jepsen, Jan ; Bundgaard, Lars ; Jensen, Pernille ; Friis, Mikkel ; Konge, Lars ; Bjerrum, Flemming. / Identifying curriculum content for a cross-specialty robotic-assisted surgery training program : a Delphi study. I: Surgical Endoscopy. 2022 ; Bind 36, Nr. 7. s. 4786-4794.

Bibtex

@article{814cec8c55a14da39db029a6409ce74d,
title = "Identifying curriculum content for a cross-specialty robotic-assisted surgery training program: a Delphi study",
abstract = "Background: Robotic-assisted surgery is increasing and there is a need for a structured and evidence-based curriculum to learn basic robotic competencies. Relevant training tasks, eligible trainees, realistic learning goals, and suitable training methods must be identified. We sought to develop a common curriculum that can ensure basic competencies across specialties. Methods: Two robotic surgeons from all departments in Denmark conducting robotic-assisted surgery within gynecology, urology, and gastrointestinal surgery, were invited to participate in a three-round Delphi study to identify learning goals and rank them according to relevance for a basic curriculum. An additional survey was conducted after the Delphi rounds on what training methods were considered best for each learning goal and who (console surgeon/patient-side assistant) should master each learning goal. Results: Fifty-six robotic surgeons participated and the response rates were 86%, 89%, and 77%, for rounds 1, 2 and 3, respectively. The Delphi study identified 40 potential learning goals, of which 29 were ranked as essential, e.g., Understand the link between arm placement and freedom of movement or Be able to perform emergency un-docking. In the additional survey, the response rate was 70%. Twenty-two (55%) of the identified learning goals were found relevant for the patient-side assistant and twenty-four (60%) were linked to a specific suitable learning method with > 75% agreement. Conclusions: Our findings can help training centers plan their training programs concerning educational content and methods for training/learning. Furthermore, patient-side assistants should also receive basic skills training in robotic surgery.",
keywords = "Cross-specialty, Curriculum development, Education, Robotic surgery",
author = "Peter Hertz and Kim Houlind and Jan Jepsen and Lars Bundgaard and Pernille Jensen and Mikkel Friis and Lars Konge and Flemming Bjerrum",
note = "Publisher Copyright: {\textcopyright} 2021, The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature.",
year = "2022",
month = jul,
doi = "10.1007/s00464-021-08821-3",
language = "English",
volume = "36",
pages = "4786--4794",
journal = "Surgical Endoscopy and Other Interventional Techniques",
issn = "0930-2794",
publisher = "Springer New York LLC",
number = "7",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Identifying curriculum content for a cross-specialty robotic-assisted surgery training program

T2 - a Delphi study

AU - Hertz, Peter

AU - Houlind, Kim

AU - Jepsen, Jan

AU - Bundgaard, Lars

AU - Jensen, Pernille

AU - Friis, Mikkel

AU - Konge, Lars

AU - Bjerrum, Flemming

N1 - Publisher Copyright: © 2021, The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature.

PY - 2022/7

Y1 - 2022/7

N2 - Background: Robotic-assisted surgery is increasing and there is a need for a structured and evidence-based curriculum to learn basic robotic competencies. Relevant training tasks, eligible trainees, realistic learning goals, and suitable training methods must be identified. We sought to develop a common curriculum that can ensure basic competencies across specialties. Methods: Two robotic surgeons from all departments in Denmark conducting robotic-assisted surgery within gynecology, urology, and gastrointestinal surgery, were invited to participate in a three-round Delphi study to identify learning goals and rank them according to relevance for a basic curriculum. An additional survey was conducted after the Delphi rounds on what training methods were considered best for each learning goal and who (console surgeon/patient-side assistant) should master each learning goal. Results: Fifty-six robotic surgeons participated and the response rates were 86%, 89%, and 77%, for rounds 1, 2 and 3, respectively. The Delphi study identified 40 potential learning goals, of which 29 were ranked as essential, e.g., Understand the link between arm placement and freedom of movement or Be able to perform emergency un-docking. In the additional survey, the response rate was 70%. Twenty-two (55%) of the identified learning goals were found relevant for the patient-side assistant and twenty-four (60%) were linked to a specific suitable learning method with > 75% agreement. Conclusions: Our findings can help training centers plan their training programs concerning educational content and methods for training/learning. Furthermore, patient-side assistants should also receive basic skills training in robotic surgery.

AB - Background: Robotic-assisted surgery is increasing and there is a need for a structured and evidence-based curriculum to learn basic robotic competencies. Relevant training tasks, eligible trainees, realistic learning goals, and suitable training methods must be identified. We sought to develop a common curriculum that can ensure basic competencies across specialties. Methods: Two robotic surgeons from all departments in Denmark conducting robotic-assisted surgery within gynecology, urology, and gastrointestinal surgery, were invited to participate in a three-round Delphi study to identify learning goals and rank them according to relevance for a basic curriculum. An additional survey was conducted after the Delphi rounds on what training methods were considered best for each learning goal and who (console surgeon/patient-side assistant) should master each learning goal. Results: Fifty-six robotic surgeons participated and the response rates were 86%, 89%, and 77%, for rounds 1, 2 and 3, respectively. The Delphi study identified 40 potential learning goals, of which 29 were ranked as essential, e.g., Understand the link between arm placement and freedom of movement or Be able to perform emergency un-docking. In the additional survey, the response rate was 70%. Twenty-two (55%) of the identified learning goals were found relevant for the patient-side assistant and twenty-four (60%) were linked to a specific suitable learning method with > 75% agreement. Conclusions: Our findings can help training centers plan their training programs concerning educational content and methods for training/learning. Furthermore, patient-side assistants should also receive basic skills training in robotic surgery.

KW - Cross-specialty

KW - Curriculum development

KW - Education

KW - Robotic surgery

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85117929322&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s00464-021-08821-3

DO - 10.1007/s00464-021-08821-3

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 34708292

AN - SCOPUS:85117929322

VL - 36

SP - 4786

EP - 4794

JO - Surgical Endoscopy and Other Interventional Techniques

JF - Surgical Endoscopy and Other Interventional Techniques

SN - 0930-2794

IS - 7

ER -

ID: 70283658