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How to schedule night shift work in order to reduce health and safety risks

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Harvard

Garde, AH, Begtrup, L, Bjorvatn, B, Bonde, JP, Hansen, J, Hansen, ÅM, Härmä, M, Jensen, MA, Kecklund, G, Kolstad, HA, Larsen, AD, Lie, JA, Moreno, CR, Nabe-Nielsen, K & Sallinen, M 2020, 'How to schedule night shift work in order to reduce health and safety risks', Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment & Health, bind 46, nr. 6, s. 557-569. https://doi.org/10.5271/sjweh.3920

APA

Garde, A. H., Begtrup, L., Bjorvatn, B., Bonde, J. P., Hansen, J., Hansen, Å. M., Härmä, M., Jensen, M. A., Kecklund, G., Kolstad, H. A., Larsen, A. D., Lie, J. A., Moreno, C. R., Nabe-Nielsen, K., & Sallinen, M. (2020). How to schedule night shift work in order to reduce health and safety risks. Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment & Health, 46(6), 557-569. https://doi.org/10.5271/sjweh.3920

CBE

Garde AH, Begtrup L, Bjorvatn B, Bonde JP, Hansen J, Hansen ÅM, Härmä M, Jensen MA, Kecklund G, Kolstad HA, Larsen AD, Lie JA, Moreno CR, Nabe-Nielsen K, Sallinen M. 2020. How to schedule night shift work in order to reduce health and safety risks. Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment & Health. 46(6):557-569. https://doi.org/10.5271/sjweh.3920

MLA

Vancouver

Author

Garde, Anne Helene ; Begtrup, Luise ; Bjorvatn, Bjørn ; Bonde, Jens Peter ; Hansen, Johnni ; Hansen, Åse Marie ; Härmä, Mikko ; Jensen, Marie Aarrebo ; Kecklund, Göran ; Kolstad, Henrik A ; Larsen, Ann Dyreborg ; Lie, Jenny Anne ; Moreno, Claudia Rc ; Nabe-Nielsen, Kirsten ; Sallinen, Mikael. / How to schedule night shift work in order to reduce health and safety risks. I: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment & Health. 2020 ; Bind 46, Nr. 6. s. 557-569.

Bibtex

@article{a7041447320f44778370136e24dd2a70,
title = "How to schedule night shift work in order to reduce health and safety risks",
abstract = "Objectives This discussion paper aims to provide scientifically based recommendations on night shift schedules, including consecutive shifts, shift intervals and duration of shifts, which may reduce health and safety risks. Short-term physiological effects in terms of circadian disruption, inadequate sleep duration and quality, and fatigue were considered as possible links between night shift work and selected health and safety risks, namely, cancer, cardio-metabolic disease, injuries, and pregnancy-related outcomes. Method In early 2020, 15 experienced shift work researchers participated in a workshop where they identified relevant scientific literature within their main research area. Results Knowledge gaps and possible recommendations were discussed based on the current evidence. The consensus was that schedules which reduce circadian disruption may reduce cancer risk, particularly for breast cancer, and schedules that optimize sleep and reduce fatigue may reduce the occurrence of injuries. This is generally achieved with fewer consecutive night shifts, sufficient shift intervals, and shorter night shift duration. Conclusions Based on the limited, existing literature, we recommend that in order to reduce the risk of injuries and possibly breast cancer, night shift schedules have: (i) ≤3 consecutive night shifts; (ii) shift intervals of ≥11 hours; and (iii) ≤9 hours shift duration. In special cases - eg, oil rigs and other isolated workplaces with better possibilities to adapt to daytime sleep - additional or other recommendations may apply. Finally, to reduce risk of miscarriage, pregnant women should not work more than one night shift in a week.",
author = "Garde, {Anne Helene} and Luise Begtrup and Bj{\o}rn Bjorvatn and Bonde, {Jens Peter} and Johnni Hansen and Hansen, {{\AA}se Marie} and Mikko H{\"a}rm{\"a} and Jensen, {Marie Aarrebo} and G{\"o}ran Kecklund and Kolstad, {Henrik A} and Larsen, {Ann Dyreborg} and Lie, {Jenny Anne} and Moreno, {Claudia Rc} and Kirsten Nabe-Nielsen and Mikael Sallinen",
year = "2020",
month = nov,
day = "1",
doi = "10.5271/sjweh.3920",
language = "English",
volume = "46",
pages = "557--569",
journal = "Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health",
issn = "0355-3140",
publisher = "Tyoterveyslaitos",
number = "6",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - How to schedule night shift work in order to reduce health and safety risks

AU - Garde, Anne Helene

AU - Begtrup, Luise

AU - Bjorvatn, Bjørn

AU - Bonde, Jens Peter

AU - Hansen, Johnni

AU - Hansen, Åse Marie

AU - Härmä, Mikko

AU - Jensen, Marie Aarrebo

AU - Kecklund, Göran

AU - Kolstad, Henrik A

AU - Larsen, Ann Dyreborg

AU - Lie, Jenny Anne

AU - Moreno, Claudia Rc

AU - Nabe-Nielsen, Kirsten

AU - Sallinen, Mikael

PY - 2020/11/1

Y1 - 2020/11/1

N2 - Objectives This discussion paper aims to provide scientifically based recommendations on night shift schedules, including consecutive shifts, shift intervals and duration of shifts, which may reduce health and safety risks. Short-term physiological effects in terms of circadian disruption, inadequate sleep duration and quality, and fatigue were considered as possible links between night shift work and selected health and safety risks, namely, cancer, cardio-metabolic disease, injuries, and pregnancy-related outcomes. Method In early 2020, 15 experienced shift work researchers participated in a workshop where they identified relevant scientific literature within their main research area. Results Knowledge gaps and possible recommendations were discussed based on the current evidence. The consensus was that schedules which reduce circadian disruption may reduce cancer risk, particularly for breast cancer, and schedules that optimize sleep and reduce fatigue may reduce the occurrence of injuries. This is generally achieved with fewer consecutive night shifts, sufficient shift intervals, and shorter night shift duration. Conclusions Based on the limited, existing literature, we recommend that in order to reduce the risk of injuries and possibly breast cancer, night shift schedules have: (i) ≤3 consecutive night shifts; (ii) shift intervals of ≥11 hours; and (iii) ≤9 hours shift duration. In special cases - eg, oil rigs and other isolated workplaces with better possibilities to adapt to daytime sleep - additional or other recommendations may apply. Finally, to reduce risk of miscarriage, pregnant women should not work more than one night shift in a week.

AB - Objectives This discussion paper aims to provide scientifically based recommendations on night shift schedules, including consecutive shifts, shift intervals and duration of shifts, which may reduce health and safety risks. Short-term physiological effects in terms of circadian disruption, inadequate sleep duration and quality, and fatigue were considered as possible links between night shift work and selected health and safety risks, namely, cancer, cardio-metabolic disease, injuries, and pregnancy-related outcomes. Method In early 2020, 15 experienced shift work researchers participated in a workshop where they identified relevant scientific literature within their main research area. Results Knowledge gaps and possible recommendations were discussed based on the current evidence. The consensus was that schedules which reduce circadian disruption may reduce cancer risk, particularly for breast cancer, and schedules that optimize sleep and reduce fatigue may reduce the occurrence of injuries. This is generally achieved with fewer consecutive night shifts, sufficient shift intervals, and shorter night shift duration. Conclusions Based on the limited, existing literature, we recommend that in order to reduce the risk of injuries and possibly breast cancer, night shift schedules have: (i) ≤3 consecutive night shifts; (ii) shift intervals of ≥11 hours; and (iii) ≤9 hours shift duration. In special cases - eg, oil rigs and other isolated workplaces with better possibilities to adapt to daytime sleep - additional or other recommendations may apply. Finally, to reduce risk of miscarriage, pregnant women should not work more than one night shift in a week.

U2 - 10.5271/sjweh.3920

DO - 10.5271/sjweh.3920

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 32895725

VL - 46

SP - 557

EP - 569

JO - Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health

JF - Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health

SN - 0355-3140

IS - 6

ER -

ID: 61373864