Forskning
Udskriv Udskriv
Switch language
Region Hovedstaden - en del af Københavns Universitetshospital
Udgivet

How to report data on bilateral procedures and other issues with clustered data: The CLUDA reporting guidelines

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  1. Reply: Breast Augmentation with Microtextured Anatomical Implants in 653 Women: Indications and Risk of Rotation

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftLetterForskningpeer review

  2. Autologous Fat Grafting as Treatment of Postmastectomy Pain Syndrome: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  3. Breast Augmentation with Microtextured Anatomical Implants in 653 Women: Indications and Risk of Rotation

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  1. Association between inflammatory markers and survival in comatose, resuscitated out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  2. Fat Grafting With Expanded Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells for Breast Augmentation: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  3. Blood-pressure targets in comatose survivors of cardiac arrest

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Vis graf over relationer

BACKGROUND: Research in plastic surgery often includes bilateral procedures. This gives rise to issues with clustered data. Clustering is when individual data points within a data set are internally related. However, many authors do not account for clustering within their data, which can lead to incorrect statistical conclusions.

METHODS: In February of 2020, the authors searched PubMed to investigate the prevalence of reporting issues with bilateral breast procedures in plastic surgery literature. The review focused on breast surgery, as it often involves bilateral procedures and, therefore, clustering. Based on the review, the authors developed guidelines for how to identify and address clustered data. The guidelines were modified by a multidisciplinary group consisting of a biostatistician with expertise in clustered data at the Section of Biostatistics, University of Copenhagen, and three doctors (M.D.s and Ph.D.s) with expertise in statistical analysis and scientific methodology from the Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet.

RESULTS: A total of 113 studies were included in the review. Seventy-five studies (66 percent) contained clustered data, but only eight studies (11 percent) took clustering into account in the statistical analysis. These results were used to develop the Clustered Data, or CLUDA, reporting guidelines which consist of two sections: one to identify clustering and one for reporting and analyzing clustered data.

CONCLUSIONS: Clustered data are abundant in plastic surgery literature. The authors propose using the Clustered Data reporting guidelines to identify and report clustered data and consulting with a biostatistician when designing a study.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftPlastic and Reconstructive Surgery
Vol/bind150
Udgave nummer2
Sider (fra-til)459-464
Antal sider6
ISSN0032-1052
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 1 aug. 2022

Bibliografisk note

Copyright © 2022 by the American Society of Plastic Surgeons.

ID: 78745661