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Region Hovedstaden - en del af Københavns Universitetshospital
Udgivet

High levels of soluble VEGF receptor 1 early after trauma are associated with shock, sympathoadrenal activation, glycocalyx degradation and inflammation in severely injured patients: a prospective study

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DOI

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  2. First-response treatment after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a survey of current practices across 29 countries in Europe

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  3. The Danish prehospital emergency healthcare system and research possibilities

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  4. New clinical guidelines on the spinal stabilisation of adult trauma patients - consensus and evidence based

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  1. Response

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  2. The handling oxygenation targets in the intensive care unit (HOT-ICU) trial: Detailed statistical analysis plan

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  3. Kommunikation, samarbejde og teamfunktion

    Publikation: Bidrag til bog/antologi/rapportBidrag til bog/antologiForskningpeer review

Vis graf over relationer
The level of soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (sVEGFR1) is increased in sepsis and strongly associated with disease severity and mortality. Endothelial activation and damage contribute to both sepsis and trauma pathology. Therefore, this study measured sVEGFR1 levels in trauma patients upon hospital admission hypothesizing that sVEGFR1 would increase with higher injury severity and predict a poor outcome.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftScandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
Vol/bind20
Sider (fra-til)27
ISSN1757-7241
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2012

ID: 36411708