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Hepatic epitheloid haemangioendothelioma: a rare malignant tumour

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Vis graf over relationer

Our case concerns a 66-year-old man. After experiencing recurrent episodes of abdominal pain, an initial CT scan, ultrasound and gastroscopy was carried out. All of which showed normal findings.As a consequence of persisting symptoms, another CT scan was performed. This scan revealed a hypodense area in the right lobe of the liver. This was interpreted as a possible haemangioma. Subsequent MRI scans indicated an intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. A final ultrasound-guided liver biopsy was performed and histology demonstrated epitheloid haemangioendothelioma, which was locally advanced and inoperable.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftBMJ Case Reports
Vol/bind13
Udgave nummer1
ISSN1757-790X
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 28 jan. 2020

Bibliografisk note

© BMJ Publishing Group Limited 2020. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ.

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