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Heart failure associated with imported malaria: a nationwide Danish cohort study

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@article{37e86b050f4b434e90b3fe58e93d11ca,
title = "Heart failure associated with imported malaria: a nationwide Danish cohort study",
abstract = "AIMS: Despite adequate treatment, recent studies have hypothesized that malaria may affect long-term cardiovascular function. We aimed to investigate the long-term risk of cardiovascular events and death in individuals with a history of imported malaria in Denmark.METHODS: Using nationwide Danish registries, we followed individuals with a history of malaria for the risk of incident heart failure (HF), myocardial infarction (MI), cardiovascular death and all-cause death (1 January 1994 to 1 January 2017). The population was age- and sex-matched with individuals without a history of malaria from the Danish population (ratio 1:9). We excluded patients with known HF and ischaemic heart disease at inclusion.RESULTS: We identified 3912 cases with a history of malaria (mean age 33 ± 17 years, 57% male, 41% Plasmodium falciparum infections). The median follow-up was 9.8 years (interquartile range 3.9-16.4 years). Event rates per 1000 person-years for individuals with a history vs. no history of malaria were HF: 1.84 vs. 1.32; MI: 1.28 vs. 1.30; cardiovascular death: 1.40 vs. 1.77; and all-cause death: 5.04 vs. 5.28. In Cox proportional hazards models adjusted for cardiovascular risk factors, concomitant pharmacotherapy, region of origin, household income and educational level, malaria was associated with HF (HR: 1.59 [1.21-2.09], P = 0.001), but not MI (HR: 1.00 [0.72-1.39], P = 1.00), cardiovascular death (HR: 1.00 [0.74-1.35], P = 0.98) or all-cause death (HR 1.11 [0.94-1.30], P = 0.21). Specifically, P. falciparum infection was associated with increased risk of HF (HR: 1.64 [1.14-2.36], P = 0.008).CONCLUSION: Individuals with a history of imported malaria, specifically P. falciparum, may have an increased risk of incident HF.",
keywords = "Epidemiology, Heart failure, Infectious diseases, Malaria, Prognosis",
author = "Philip Brainin and Mohr, {Grimur H{\o}gnason} and Daniel Modin and Brian Claggett and Silvestre, {Odilson M} and Amil Shah and Vestergaard, {Lasse S} and Jensen, {Jens Ulrik Staehr} and Lars Hviid and Christian Torp-Pedersen and Lars K{\o}ber and Scott Solomon and Morten Schou and Gislason, {Gunnar H} and Tor Biering-S{\o}rensen",
note = "{\textcopyright} 2021 The Authors. ESC Heart Failure published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of European Society of Cardiology.",
year = "2021",
month = oct,
doi = "10.1002/ehf2.13441",
language = "English",
volume = "8",
pages = "3521--3529",
journal = "E S C Heart Failure",
issn = "2055-5822",
publisher = "JohnWiley & Sons Ltd",
number = "5",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Heart failure associated with imported malaria

T2 - a nationwide Danish cohort study

AU - Brainin, Philip

AU - Mohr, Grimur Høgnason

AU - Modin, Daniel

AU - Claggett, Brian

AU - Silvestre, Odilson M

AU - Shah, Amil

AU - Vestergaard, Lasse S

AU - Jensen, Jens Ulrik Staehr

AU - Hviid, Lars

AU - Torp-Pedersen, Christian

AU - Køber, Lars

AU - Solomon, Scott

AU - Schou, Morten

AU - Gislason, Gunnar H

AU - Biering-Sørensen, Tor

N1 - © 2021 The Authors. ESC Heart Failure published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of European Society of Cardiology.

PY - 2021/10

Y1 - 2021/10

N2 - AIMS: Despite adequate treatment, recent studies have hypothesized that malaria may affect long-term cardiovascular function. We aimed to investigate the long-term risk of cardiovascular events and death in individuals with a history of imported malaria in Denmark.METHODS: Using nationwide Danish registries, we followed individuals with a history of malaria for the risk of incident heart failure (HF), myocardial infarction (MI), cardiovascular death and all-cause death (1 January 1994 to 1 January 2017). The population was age- and sex-matched with individuals without a history of malaria from the Danish population (ratio 1:9). We excluded patients with known HF and ischaemic heart disease at inclusion.RESULTS: We identified 3912 cases with a history of malaria (mean age 33 ± 17 years, 57% male, 41% Plasmodium falciparum infections). The median follow-up was 9.8 years (interquartile range 3.9-16.4 years). Event rates per 1000 person-years for individuals with a history vs. no history of malaria were HF: 1.84 vs. 1.32; MI: 1.28 vs. 1.30; cardiovascular death: 1.40 vs. 1.77; and all-cause death: 5.04 vs. 5.28. In Cox proportional hazards models adjusted for cardiovascular risk factors, concomitant pharmacotherapy, region of origin, household income and educational level, malaria was associated with HF (HR: 1.59 [1.21-2.09], P = 0.001), but not MI (HR: 1.00 [0.72-1.39], P = 1.00), cardiovascular death (HR: 1.00 [0.74-1.35], P = 0.98) or all-cause death (HR 1.11 [0.94-1.30], P = 0.21). Specifically, P. falciparum infection was associated with increased risk of HF (HR: 1.64 [1.14-2.36], P = 0.008).CONCLUSION: Individuals with a history of imported malaria, specifically P. falciparum, may have an increased risk of incident HF.

AB - AIMS: Despite adequate treatment, recent studies have hypothesized that malaria may affect long-term cardiovascular function. We aimed to investigate the long-term risk of cardiovascular events and death in individuals with a history of imported malaria in Denmark.METHODS: Using nationwide Danish registries, we followed individuals with a history of malaria for the risk of incident heart failure (HF), myocardial infarction (MI), cardiovascular death and all-cause death (1 January 1994 to 1 January 2017). The population was age- and sex-matched with individuals without a history of malaria from the Danish population (ratio 1:9). We excluded patients with known HF and ischaemic heart disease at inclusion.RESULTS: We identified 3912 cases with a history of malaria (mean age 33 ± 17 years, 57% male, 41% Plasmodium falciparum infections). The median follow-up was 9.8 years (interquartile range 3.9-16.4 years). Event rates per 1000 person-years for individuals with a history vs. no history of malaria were HF: 1.84 vs. 1.32; MI: 1.28 vs. 1.30; cardiovascular death: 1.40 vs. 1.77; and all-cause death: 5.04 vs. 5.28. In Cox proportional hazards models adjusted for cardiovascular risk factors, concomitant pharmacotherapy, region of origin, household income and educational level, malaria was associated with HF (HR: 1.59 [1.21-2.09], P = 0.001), but not MI (HR: 1.00 [0.72-1.39], P = 1.00), cardiovascular death (HR: 1.00 [0.74-1.35], P = 0.98) or all-cause death (HR 1.11 [0.94-1.30], P = 0.21). Specifically, P. falciparum infection was associated with increased risk of HF (HR: 1.64 [1.14-2.36], P = 0.008).CONCLUSION: Individuals with a history of imported malaria, specifically P. falciparum, may have an increased risk of incident HF.

KW - Epidemiology

KW - Heart failure

KW - Infectious diseases

KW - Malaria

KW - Prognosis

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85111334426&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/ehf2.13441

DO - 10.1002/ehf2.13441

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 34313024

VL - 8

SP - 3521

EP - 3529

JO - E S C Heart Failure

JF - E S C Heart Failure

SN - 2055-5822

IS - 5

ER -

ID: 67060986