Forskning
Udskriv Udskriv
Switch language
Region Hovedstaden - en del af Københavns Universitetshospital
Udgivet

Heart failure and the prognostic impact and incidence of new-onset of diabetes mellitus: a nationwide cohort study

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Harvard

APA

CBE

MLA

Vancouver

Author

Bibtex

@article{d981ca58b76c4aeea8ad95d115259629,
title = "Heart failure and the prognostic impact and incidence of new-onset of diabetes mellitus: a nationwide cohort study",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Prevalent diabetes at the time of heart failure (HF) diagnosis is associated with a higher risk of death, but the incidence and prognostic importance of new-onset diabetes in patients with established HF remains unknown.METHODS: Patients with a first hospitalization for HF in the period 2003-2014 were included and stratified according to history of diabetes. Annual incidence rates of new-onset diabetes were calculated and time-dependent multivariable Cox regression models were used to compare the risk of death in patients with prevalent and new-onset diabetes with patients without diabetes as reference. The model was adjusted for age, sex, duration of HF, educational level and comorbidity. Covariates were continuously updated throughout follow-up.RESULTS: A total of 104,522 HF patients were included in the study, of which 21,216 (19{\%}) patients had diabetes at baseline, and 8164 (10{\%}) developed new-onset diabetes during a mean follow-up of 3.9 years. Patients with new-onset diabetes and prevalent diabetes were slightly younger than patients without diabetes (70 vs. 74 and 77, respectively), more likely to be men (62{\%} vs. 60{\%} and 54{\%}), and had more comorbidities expect for ischemic heart disease, hypertension and chronic kidney disease which were more prevalent among patients with prevalent diabetes. Incidence rates of new-onset diabetes increased from around 2 per 100 person-years in the first years following HF hospitalization up to 3 per 100 person-years after 5 years of follow-up. A total of 61,424 (59{\%}) patients died during the study period with event rates per 100 person-years of 21.5 for new-onset diabetes, 17.9 for prevalent diabetes and 13.9 for patients without diabetes. Compared to patients without diabetes, new-onset diabetes was associated with a higher risk of death (adjusted HR 1.47; 95{\%} CI 1.42-1.52) and prevalent diabetes was associated with an intermediate risk (HR 1.19; 95{\%} CI, 1.16-1.21).CONCLUSION: Following the first HF hospitalization, the incidence of new-onset diabetes was around 2{\%} per year, rising to 3{\%} after 5 years of follow-up. New-onset diabetes was associated with an increased risk of death, compared to HF patients with prevalent diabetes (intermediate risk) and HF patients without diabetes.",
keywords = "Heart failure, Prognosis, Type 2 diabetes mellitus",
author = "B Zareini and Rasmus R{\o}rth and Anders Holt and Mogensen, {Ulrik M} and Christian Selmer and Gunnar Gislason and Morten Schou and Lars K{\o}ber and Christian Torp-Pedersen and Morten Lamberts and Kristensen, {S{\o}ren Lund}",
year = "2019",
month = "6",
day = "12",
doi = "10.1186/s12933-019-0883-4",
language = "English",
volume = "18",
journal = "Cardiovascular Diabetology",
issn = "1475-2840",
publisher = "BioMed Central Ltd",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Heart failure and the prognostic impact and incidence of new-onset of diabetes mellitus

T2 - a nationwide cohort study

AU - Zareini, B

AU - Rørth, Rasmus

AU - Holt, Anders

AU - Mogensen, Ulrik M

AU - Selmer, Christian

AU - Gislason, Gunnar

AU - Schou, Morten

AU - Køber, Lars

AU - Torp-Pedersen, Christian

AU - Lamberts, Morten

AU - Kristensen, Søren Lund

PY - 2019/6/12

Y1 - 2019/6/12

N2 - BACKGROUND: Prevalent diabetes at the time of heart failure (HF) diagnosis is associated with a higher risk of death, but the incidence and prognostic importance of new-onset diabetes in patients with established HF remains unknown.METHODS: Patients with a first hospitalization for HF in the period 2003-2014 were included and stratified according to history of diabetes. Annual incidence rates of new-onset diabetes were calculated and time-dependent multivariable Cox regression models were used to compare the risk of death in patients with prevalent and new-onset diabetes with patients without diabetes as reference. The model was adjusted for age, sex, duration of HF, educational level and comorbidity. Covariates were continuously updated throughout follow-up.RESULTS: A total of 104,522 HF patients were included in the study, of which 21,216 (19%) patients had diabetes at baseline, and 8164 (10%) developed new-onset diabetes during a mean follow-up of 3.9 years. Patients with new-onset diabetes and prevalent diabetes were slightly younger than patients without diabetes (70 vs. 74 and 77, respectively), more likely to be men (62% vs. 60% and 54%), and had more comorbidities expect for ischemic heart disease, hypertension and chronic kidney disease which were more prevalent among patients with prevalent diabetes. Incidence rates of new-onset diabetes increased from around 2 per 100 person-years in the first years following HF hospitalization up to 3 per 100 person-years after 5 years of follow-up. A total of 61,424 (59%) patients died during the study period with event rates per 100 person-years of 21.5 for new-onset diabetes, 17.9 for prevalent diabetes and 13.9 for patients without diabetes. Compared to patients without diabetes, new-onset diabetes was associated with a higher risk of death (adjusted HR 1.47; 95% CI 1.42-1.52) and prevalent diabetes was associated with an intermediate risk (HR 1.19; 95% CI, 1.16-1.21).CONCLUSION: Following the first HF hospitalization, the incidence of new-onset diabetes was around 2% per year, rising to 3% after 5 years of follow-up. New-onset diabetes was associated with an increased risk of death, compared to HF patients with prevalent diabetes (intermediate risk) and HF patients without diabetes.

AB - BACKGROUND: Prevalent diabetes at the time of heart failure (HF) diagnosis is associated with a higher risk of death, but the incidence and prognostic importance of new-onset diabetes in patients with established HF remains unknown.METHODS: Patients with a first hospitalization for HF in the period 2003-2014 were included and stratified according to history of diabetes. Annual incidence rates of new-onset diabetes were calculated and time-dependent multivariable Cox regression models were used to compare the risk of death in patients with prevalent and new-onset diabetes with patients without diabetes as reference. The model was adjusted for age, sex, duration of HF, educational level and comorbidity. Covariates were continuously updated throughout follow-up.RESULTS: A total of 104,522 HF patients were included in the study, of which 21,216 (19%) patients had diabetes at baseline, and 8164 (10%) developed new-onset diabetes during a mean follow-up of 3.9 years. Patients with new-onset diabetes and prevalent diabetes were slightly younger than patients without diabetes (70 vs. 74 and 77, respectively), more likely to be men (62% vs. 60% and 54%), and had more comorbidities expect for ischemic heart disease, hypertension and chronic kidney disease which were more prevalent among patients with prevalent diabetes. Incidence rates of new-onset diabetes increased from around 2 per 100 person-years in the first years following HF hospitalization up to 3 per 100 person-years after 5 years of follow-up. A total of 61,424 (59%) patients died during the study period with event rates per 100 person-years of 21.5 for new-onset diabetes, 17.9 for prevalent diabetes and 13.9 for patients without diabetes. Compared to patients without diabetes, new-onset diabetes was associated with a higher risk of death (adjusted HR 1.47; 95% CI 1.42-1.52) and prevalent diabetes was associated with an intermediate risk (HR 1.19; 95% CI, 1.16-1.21).CONCLUSION: Following the first HF hospitalization, the incidence of new-onset diabetes was around 2% per year, rising to 3% after 5 years of follow-up. New-onset diabetes was associated with an increased risk of death, compared to HF patients with prevalent diabetes (intermediate risk) and HF patients without diabetes.

KW - Heart failure

KW - Prognosis

KW - Type 2 diabetes mellitus

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85068191549&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1186/s12933-019-0883-4

DO - 10.1186/s12933-019-0883-4

M3 - Journal article

VL - 18

JO - Cardiovascular Diabetology

JF - Cardiovascular Diabetology

SN - 1475-2840

IS - 1

M1 - 79

ER -

ID: 57375309