Forskning
Udskriv Udskriv
Switch language
Region Hovedstaden - en del af Københavns Universitetshospital
Udgivet

HDL Cholesterol and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes: A Mendelian Randomization Study

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

DOI

  1. Glucagon Clearance is Preserved in Type 2 Diabetes

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  2. Distinct Molecular Signatures of Clinical Clusters in People with Type 2 Diabetes: an IMI-RHAPSODY Study

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  3. Differential DNA Methylation and Expression of miRNAs in Adipose Tissue From Twin Pairs Discordant for Type 2 Diabetes

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  4. The low-expression variant of FABP4 is associated with cardiovascular disease in type 1 diabetes

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  1. Coagulation parameters in the newborn and infant - the Copenhagen Baby Heart and COMPARE studies

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  2. Lipoprotein(a) levels at birth and in early childhood: The COMPARE Study

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  3. Triglyceride-rich Lipoprotein Cholesterol (Remnant Cholesterol) as a Therapeutic Target for Cardiovascular Disease Risk

    Publikation: Bidrag til bog/antologi/rapportBidrag til bog/antologiFormidling

  4. A possible explanation for the contrasting results of REDUCE-IT vs. STRENGTH: cohort study mimicking trial designs

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Vis graf over relationer

Observationally, low levels of HDL cholesterol are consistently associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes. Therefore, plasma HDL cholesterol increasing has been suggested as a novel therapeutic option to reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes. Whether levels of HDL cholesterol are causally associated with type 2 diabetes is unknown. In a prospective study of the general population (n = 47,627), we tested whether HDL cholesterol-related genetic variants were associated with low HDL cholesterol levels and, in turn, with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. HDL cholesterol-decreasing gene scores and allele numbers associated with up to -13 and -20% reductions in HDL cholesterol levels. The corresponding theoretically predicted hazard ratios for type 2 diabetes were 1.44 (95% CI 1.38-1.52) and 1.77 (1.61-1.95), whereas the genetic estimates were nonsignificant. Genetic risk ratios for type 2 diabetes for a 0.2 mmol/L reduction in HDL cholesterol were 0.91 (0.75-1.09) and 0.93 (0.78-1.11) for HDL cholesterol-decreasing gene scores and allele numbers, respectively, compared with the corresponding observational hazard ratio of 1.37 (1.32-1.42). In conclusion, genetically reduced HDL cholesterol does not associate with increased risk of type 2 diabetes, suggesting that the corresponding observational association is due to confounding and/or reverse causation.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftDiabetes
Vol/bind64
Udgave nummer9
Sider (fra-til)3328-33
Antal sider6
ISSN0012-1797
DOI
StatusUdgivet - sep. 2015

ID: 45923879