Forskning
Udskriv Udskriv
Switch language
Region Hovedstaden - en del af Københavns Universitetshospital
Udgivet

Harmonization of Databases: A Step for Advancing the Knowledge About Spinal Cord Injury

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

DOI

  1. Differences in Acute Metabolic Responses to Bionic and Nonbionic Ambulation in Spinal Cord Injured Humans and Controls

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  2. The Association between Social Engagement, Mild Cognitive Impairment and Falls among Older Primary Care Patients

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  3. Association of Physical Fitness With Fibromyalgia Severity in Women: The al-Ándalus Project

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  4. Predictors of long term mortality in older people with hip fracture

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  1. Differences in Acute Metabolic Responses to Bionic and Nonbionic Ambulation in Spinal Cord Injured Humans and Controls

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  2. Epidemiological characteristics and early complications after spinal cord injury in Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  3. International Perspectives on Spinal Cord Injury Care

    Publikation: Bidrag til bog/antologi/rapportBidrag til bog/antologiForskningpeer review

  • Susan Charlifue
  • Denise Tate
  • Fin Biering-Sorensen
  • Stephen Burns
  • Yuying Chen
  • Sophia Chun
  • Lyn B Jakeman
  • Robert G Kowalski
  • Vanessa K Noonan
  • Philip Ullrich
Vis graf over relationer

The objectives of this article are to (1) provide an overview of existing spinal cord injury (SCI) clinical research databases-their purposes, characteristics, and accessibility to users; and (2) present a vision for future collaborations required for cross-cutting research in SCI. This vision highlights the need for validated and relevant data for longitudinal clinical trials and observational and epidemiologic SCI-related studies. Three existing SCI clinical research databases/registries are reviewed and summarized with regard to current formats, collection methods, and uses, including major strengths and weaknesses. Efforts to provide a uniform approach to data collection are also reviewed. The databases reviewed offer different approaches to capture important clinical information on SCI. They vary on size, purpose, data points, inclusion of standard outcomes, and technical requirements. Each presents with a set of limitations including lack of population data and lack of a common platform for data comparisons and exchanges. It is clear that numerous issues need to be considered when planning to establish common ways of collecting data through data sets or patient registries, ranging from a carefully crafted implementation plan that lists purposes, cost, resources required, and policies to guide such development to establishing a framework for dissemination of data and findings. For the present, taking advantage of the vast but different data already collected over many decades may require a variety of statistical skills and epidemiologic techniques. Ultimately, our ability to speak the same language with regard to variables and assessment tools will facilitate international collaborations and enhance comparability, data pooling, and the ability to generalize findings to a broader population.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftArchives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Vol/bind97
Udgave nummer10
Sider (fra-til)1805-18
Antal sider14
ISSN0003-9993
DOI
StatusUdgivet - okt. 2016

ID: 49627064