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Region Hovedstaden - en del af Københavns Universitetshospital
Udgivet

Genetic liability to major depression and risk of childhood asthma

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

DOI

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OBJECTIVE: Major depression and asthma frequently co-occur, suggesting shared genetic vulnerability between these two disorders. We aimed to determine whether a higher genetic liability to major depression was associated with increased childhood asthma risk, and if so, whether such an association differed by sex of the child.

METHODS: We conducted a population-based cohort study comprising 16,687 singletons born between 1991 and 2005 in Denmark. We calculated the polygenic risk score (PRS) for major depression as a measure of genetic liability based on the summary statistics from the Major Depressive Disorder Psychiatric Genomics Consortium collaboration. The outcome was incident asthma from age 5 to 15 years, identified from the Danish National Patient Registry and the Danish National Prescription Registry. Stratified Cox regression was used to analyze the data.

RESULTS: Greater genetic liability to major depression was associated with an increased asthma risk with a hazard ratio (HR) of 1.06 (95% CI: 1.01-1.10) per standard deviation increase in PRS. Children in the highest major depression PRS quartile had a HR for asthma of 1.20 (95% CI: 1.06-1.36), compared with children in the lowest quartile. However, major depression PRS explained only 0.03% of asthma variance (Pseudo-R2). The HRs of asthma by major depression PRS did not differ between boys and girls.

CONCLUSION: Our results suggest a shared genetic contribution to major depression and childhood asthma, and there is no evidence of a sex-specific difference in the association.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftBrain, Behavior, and Immunity
Vol/bind89
Sider (fra-til)433-439
Antal sider7
ISSN0889-1591
DOI
StatusUdgivet - okt. 2020

Bibliografisk note

Copyright © 2020 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

ID: 60589773