Forskning
Udskriv Udskriv
Switch language
Region Hovedstaden - en del af Københavns Universitetshospital
Udgivet

Feasibility and Effectiveness of an Individualized 12-Week "Uptime" Participation (U-PART) Intervention in Girls and Women With Rett Syndrome

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

DOI

  1. Self-Managed Surveillance for breast cancer-related upper body issues: a feasibility and reliability study

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  2. Self-Measured Arm Circumference in Women With Breast Cancer Is Reliable and Valid

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  3. Early mobilisation of patients with community-acquired pneumonia reduce length of hospitalisation-a pilot study

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  4. Muscle activation and perceived loading during rehabilitation exercises: comparison of dumbbells and elastic resistance

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  5. Increasing muscle extensibility: a matter of increasing length or modifying sensation?

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  1. Delineation of phenotypes and genotypes related to cohesin structural protein RAD21

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  2. Autism and developmental disability caused by KCNQ3 gain-of-function variants

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  3. Patterns of sedentary time and ambulatory physical activity in a Danish population of girls and women with Rett syndrome

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  4. Analysis of the Phenotypes in the Rett Networked Database

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Vis graf over relationer

BACKGROUND: Girls and women with Rett Syndrome (RTT) have low levels of daily physical activity and high levels of sedentary time. Reducing sedentary time and enhancing "uptime" activities, such as standing and walking, could be an important focus for interventions to address long-term health and quality of life in RTT.

OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to evaluate the feasibility and health-related effects of an individualized 12-week uptime participation (U-PART) intervention in girls and women with RTT.

DESIGN: The study used a single-group pretest-posttest design with 4 assessments (2 baseline, postintervention, and follow-up).

METHODS: A participation-based intervention employing a whole-day approach was used. During a 12-week intervention period, individualized programs focused on participation in enjoyable uptime activities in home, school/day center, and community settings. Feasibility was assessed with a study-specific questionnaire. Primary outcome measures were sedentary time and daily step count. Secondary outcomes were gross motor skills, walking capacity, quality of life, and goal attainment scaling.

RESULTS: Fourteen girls and women who were 5 to 48 years old and had RTT participated. The U-PART intervention was perceived as feasible by caregivers. Similar scores were observed at baseline assessments in all outcomes. Positive effects with small to medium effect sizes (0.27-0.54) were seen in sedentary time (- 4%), daily step count (+ 689 steps/d), walking capacity (+ 18.8 m), quality of life (+ 2.75 points), and goal attainment scaling after the intervention. Positive effects were maintained in sedentary time (- 3.2%) and walking capacity (+ 12.1 m) at short-term follow-up.

LIMITATIONS: This study was limited by the lack of a control group. However, participants acted as their own control, and the stable baseline period partially mitigated this issue.

CONCLUSIONS: The U-PART intervention was found to be feasible and effective in the short term in girls and women with RTT.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftPhysical Therapy
Vol/bind100
Udgave nummer1
Sider (fra-til)168-179
Antal sider12
ISSN0031-9023
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 23 jan. 2020

Bibliografisk note

© 2019 American Physical Therapy Association.

ID: 62103564