Forskning
Udskriv Udskriv
Switch language
Region Hovedstaden - en del af Københavns Universitetshospital
Udgivet

Exploring protective and risk factors in the home environment in high-risk families - results from the Danish High Risk and Resilience Study-VIA 7

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Harvard

APA

CBE

MLA

Vancouver

Author

Bibtex

@article{63e285451aa949e9b3d4e44bd71a1d04,
title = "Exploring protective and risk factors in the home environment in high-risk families - results from the Danish High Risk and Resilience Study-VIA 7",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Exposure to inadequate home environment may put the healthy development of familial high-risk children at risk. This study aimed to investigate associations between risk factors and an adequate home environment of children having a parent diagnosed with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder.METHODS: From a cohort of 522 children, data from 463 7-year-old children was included. Of these 172 children had familial risk for schizophrenia, 109 children had familial risk for bipolar disorder, and 190 were population-based controls. As part of a comprehensive battery, all participants were assessed with the Middle Childhood-Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment Inventory (MC-HOME Inventory) measuring the quality of the home environment.RESULTS: When analyzing all families together, we found that having a parent diagnosed with schizophrenia would have a negative impact on the home environment ({\ss} = -1.08; 95% CI (-2.16;-0.01); p = 0.05), while familial risk for bipolar disorder did not show significant predictive value. Being a single caregiver and child having experienced severe life events from ages 4 to 7 showed significant negative impact, while child having a mental illness diagnosis did not. Being a female caregiver, good social functioning of the caregiver, high child IQ and not being a single caregiver were found to predict positive values for the home environment. We found similar results when analyzing caregivers with and without a diagnosis separately.CONCLUSIONS: Knowledge of what predicts good home environment should be used to inform development of early interventions for families at risk.",
author = "Thorup, {Anne Amalie Elgaard} and Gantriis, {Ditte Lou} and Greve, {Aja Neergaard} and Henriksen, {Maria Toft} and Zahle, {Kate Kold} and Henriette Stadsgaard and Ditte Ellersgaard and Burton, {Birgitte Klee} and Christiani, {Camilla Jerlang} and Katrine Spang and Nicoline Hemager and Jepsen, {Jens Richardt M{\o}llegaard} and Plessen, {Kerstin J} and Merete Nordentoft and Ole Mors and Vibeke Bliksted",
note = "{\textcopyright} 2022. The Author(s).",
year = "2022",
month = feb,
day = "9",
doi = "10.1186/s12888-022-03733-5",
language = "English",
volume = "22",
journal = "BMC Psychiatry",
issn = "1471-244X",
publisher = "BioMed Central Ltd",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Exploring protective and risk factors in the home environment in high-risk families - results from the Danish High Risk and Resilience Study-VIA 7

AU - Thorup, Anne Amalie Elgaard

AU - Gantriis, Ditte Lou

AU - Greve, Aja Neergaard

AU - Henriksen, Maria Toft

AU - Zahle, Kate Kold

AU - Stadsgaard, Henriette

AU - Ellersgaard, Ditte

AU - Burton, Birgitte Klee

AU - Christiani, Camilla Jerlang

AU - Spang, Katrine

AU - Hemager, Nicoline

AU - Jepsen, Jens Richardt Møllegaard

AU - Plessen, Kerstin J

AU - Nordentoft, Merete

AU - Mors, Ole

AU - Bliksted, Vibeke

N1 - © 2022. The Author(s).

PY - 2022/2/9

Y1 - 2022/2/9

N2 - BACKGROUND: Exposure to inadequate home environment may put the healthy development of familial high-risk children at risk. This study aimed to investigate associations between risk factors and an adequate home environment of children having a parent diagnosed with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder.METHODS: From a cohort of 522 children, data from 463 7-year-old children was included. Of these 172 children had familial risk for schizophrenia, 109 children had familial risk for bipolar disorder, and 190 were population-based controls. As part of a comprehensive battery, all participants were assessed with the Middle Childhood-Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment Inventory (MC-HOME Inventory) measuring the quality of the home environment.RESULTS: When analyzing all families together, we found that having a parent diagnosed with schizophrenia would have a negative impact on the home environment (ß = -1.08; 95% CI (-2.16;-0.01); p = 0.05), while familial risk for bipolar disorder did not show significant predictive value. Being a single caregiver and child having experienced severe life events from ages 4 to 7 showed significant negative impact, while child having a mental illness diagnosis did not. Being a female caregiver, good social functioning of the caregiver, high child IQ and not being a single caregiver were found to predict positive values for the home environment. We found similar results when analyzing caregivers with and without a diagnosis separately.CONCLUSIONS: Knowledge of what predicts good home environment should be used to inform development of early interventions for families at risk.

AB - BACKGROUND: Exposure to inadequate home environment may put the healthy development of familial high-risk children at risk. This study aimed to investigate associations between risk factors and an adequate home environment of children having a parent diagnosed with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder.METHODS: From a cohort of 522 children, data from 463 7-year-old children was included. Of these 172 children had familial risk for schizophrenia, 109 children had familial risk for bipolar disorder, and 190 were population-based controls. As part of a comprehensive battery, all participants were assessed with the Middle Childhood-Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment Inventory (MC-HOME Inventory) measuring the quality of the home environment.RESULTS: When analyzing all families together, we found that having a parent diagnosed with schizophrenia would have a negative impact on the home environment (ß = -1.08; 95% CI (-2.16;-0.01); p = 0.05), while familial risk for bipolar disorder did not show significant predictive value. Being a single caregiver and child having experienced severe life events from ages 4 to 7 showed significant negative impact, while child having a mental illness diagnosis did not. Being a female caregiver, good social functioning of the caregiver, high child IQ and not being a single caregiver were found to predict positive values for the home environment. We found similar results when analyzing caregivers with and without a diagnosis separately.CONCLUSIONS: Knowledge of what predicts good home environment should be used to inform development of early interventions for families at risk.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85124263083&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1186/s12888-022-03733-5

DO - 10.1186/s12888-022-03733-5

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 35139818

VL - 22

JO - BMC Psychiatry

JF - BMC Psychiatry

SN - 1471-244X

M1 - 100

ER -

ID: 75281290