Forskning
Udskriv Udskriv
Switch language
Region Hovedstaden - en del af Københavns Universitetshospital
Udgivet

Experiences of family caregivers the first six months after patient diagnosis of necrotising soft tissue infection: A thematic analysis

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Harvard

APA

CBE

MLA

Vancouver

Author

Bibtex

@article{a0e9e03087934596bf6fcad3052cc756,
title = "Experiences of family caregivers the first six months after patient diagnosis of necrotising soft tissue infection: A thematic analysis",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Necrotising soft tissue infection, or necrotising fasciitis, is a rapidly progressing disease requiring immediate diagnosis and treatment consisting of antimicrobial therapy, hyperbaric oxygen, debridement surgery and treatment in the intensive care unit. The harrowing illness trajectory affects the family caregivers potentially producing long-term psychological issues.OBJECTIVES: We aimed to explore the experiences and coping strategies of family caregivers during the first six months after patient diagnosis of necrotising soft tissue infection.METHODS: Our study had a prospective, explorative, qualitative design using semi-structured interviews and thematic analysis to understand necrotising soft tissue infection as an intrinsic and instrumental case. Family caregivers (n = 25) were recruited at three university hospitals in Denmark and Sweden.FINDINGS: We identified three chronological themes describing issues of importance to the family caregivers. In the intensive care unit: Coping with illness and intensive care; In the ward: Coping with injury and post-intensive care and At home: Coping with recovery and new home life.CONCLUSION: Challenges facing family caregivers of necrotising soft tissue infections survivors are still under-recognised. Healthcare professionals need to ensure that families and stakeholders throughout the patient trajectory have access to and co-create timely information and care plans to bridge the knowledge gap across care environments and to relieve family responsibility.",
author = "Knudsen, {Vibeke E} and Andersson, {Annette E} and Ann-Mari Fagerdahl and Ingrid Egerod",
note = "Copyright {\circledC} 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.",
year = "2018",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1016/j.iccn.2018.05.005",
language = "English",
volume = "49",
pages = "28--36",
journal = "Intensive and Critical Care Nursing",
issn = "0964-3397",
publisher = "Churchill Livingstone",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Experiences of family caregivers the first six months after patient diagnosis of necrotising soft tissue infection

T2 - A thematic analysis

AU - Knudsen, Vibeke E

AU - Andersson, Annette E

AU - Fagerdahl, Ann-Mari

AU - Egerod, Ingrid

N1 - Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

PY - 2018/12

Y1 - 2018/12

N2 - BACKGROUND: Necrotising soft tissue infection, or necrotising fasciitis, is a rapidly progressing disease requiring immediate diagnosis and treatment consisting of antimicrobial therapy, hyperbaric oxygen, debridement surgery and treatment in the intensive care unit. The harrowing illness trajectory affects the family caregivers potentially producing long-term psychological issues.OBJECTIVES: We aimed to explore the experiences and coping strategies of family caregivers during the first six months after patient diagnosis of necrotising soft tissue infection.METHODS: Our study had a prospective, explorative, qualitative design using semi-structured interviews and thematic analysis to understand necrotising soft tissue infection as an intrinsic and instrumental case. Family caregivers (n = 25) were recruited at three university hospitals in Denmark and Sweden.FINDINGS: We identified three chronological themes describing issues of importance to the family caregivers. In the intensive care unit: Coping with illness and intensive care; In the ward: Coping with injury and post-intensive care and At home: Coping with recovery and new home life.CONCLUSION: Challenges facing family caregivers of necrotising soft tissue infections survivors are still under-recognised. Healthcare professionals need to ensure that families and stakeholders throughout the patient trajectory have access to and co-create timely information and care plans to bridge the knowledge gap across care environments and to relieve family responsibility.

AB - BACKGROUND: Necrotising soft tissue infection, or necrotising fasciitis, is a rapidly progressing disease requiring immediate diagnosis and treatment consisting of antimicrobial therapy, hyperbaric oxygen, debridement surgery and treatment in the intensive care unit. The harrowing illness trajectory affects the family caregivers potentially producing long-term psychological issues.OBJECTIVES: We aimed to explore the experiences and coping strategies of family caregivers during the first six months after patient diagnosis of necrotising soft tissue infection.METHODS: Our study had a prospective, explorative, qualitative design using semi-structured interviews and thematic analysis to understand necrotising soft tissue infection as an intrinsic and instrumental case. Family caregivers (n = 25) were recruited at three university hospitals in Denmark and Sweden.FINDINGS: We identified three chronological themes describing issues of importance to the family caregivers. In the intensive care unit: Coping with illness and intensive care; In the ward: Coping with injury and post-intensive care and At home: Coping with recovery and new home life.CONCLUSION: Challenges facing family caregivers of necrotising soft tissue infections survivors are still under-recognised. Healthcare professionals need to ensure that families and stakeholders throughout the patient trajectory have access to and co-create timely information and care plans to bridge the knowledge gap across care environments and to relieve family responsibility.

U2 - 10.1016/j.iccn.2018.05.005

DO - 10.1016/j.iccn.2018.05.005

M3 - Journal article

VL - 49

SP - 28

EP - 36

JO - Intensive and Critical Care Nursing

JF - Intensive and Critical Care Nursing

SN - 0964-3397

ER -

ID: 56237167