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Udgivet

Exercise protects from cancer through regulation of immune function and inflammation

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftReviewForskningpeer review

DOI

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Vis graf over relationer

Exercise training has been extensively studied in cancer settings as part of prevention or rehabilitation strategies, yet emerging evidence suggests that exercise training can also directly affect tumor-specific outcomes. The underlying mechanisms for this exercise-dependent cancer protection are just starting to be elucidated. To this end, evasion of immune surveillance and tumor-associated inflammation are established as hallmarks of cancer, and exercise may target cancer incidence and progression through regulation of these mechanisms. Here, I review the role of exercise in protection from cancer through mobilization and activation of cytotoxic immune cells, restriction of inflammatory signaling pathways in myeloid immune cells, and regulation of acute and chronic systemic inflammatory responses. In conclusion, I propose that exercise has the potential to target tumor growth through regulation of immune and inflammatory functions, and exercise may be pursued as anticancer treatment through incorporation into standard oncological therapy to the benefit of the cancer patients.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftBiochemical Society Transactions
Vol/bind45
Udgave nummer4
Sider (fra-til)905-11
Antal sider7
ISSN0300-5127
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 15 aug. 2017

ID: 52608367